Resources

 

What Research Tells Us About Best Practices for Recruiting Girls into Computing

In this video, Lecia Barker (National Center for Women in Information Technology) discusses research on best practices for outreach to young women and minority students. Lecia looks at the research evidence underlying the choices you need to make when doing a roadshow presentation, specifically why you choose the messages and the activities that you choose. http://csta.acm.org/Videos/whatresearchtellsus.mov

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Talk with Faculty Colleagues About Stereotype Threat

This Talking Point Card explains stereotype threat and how it is triggered, shares examples of effects from stereotype threat, and suggests ways to create a stereotype threat-free environment for attracting able and diverse students to computing.

Roadshow-in-a-Box: Capitalizing on Models for Outreach

Roadshow-in-a-Box: Capitalizing on Models for Outreach

Roadshow-in-a-Box is a complete set of resources developed for colleges and universities wanting to establish or enhance their roadshow outreach programs. It draws on the wisdom and practices of a variety of successful roadshow programs that focus on recruiting for diversity and put trained student presenters in a leading role. The Box includes program advice, templates, and sample materials to aid your efforts in every aspect of a sustainable roadshow program. Components include: Controlled Message, Support, Ongoing School Partnerships, Trained Student Presenters, Program Activities, and Evaluation and Tracking.

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Storytelling (Case Study 1)

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Storytelling (Case Study 1)

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects. By focusing on problem-solving skills, the computer programming environment “Learning to Program with Alice” takes a new approach that helps students see programming as a series of causal relationships.

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Comparing U.S. K-12 Students' Math and Science Performance Internationally: What are the facts, what do they mean for educational reform, and how do I talk effectively about the issues?

In the popular press and in public debate, one often hears that U.S. students are performing poorly in math and science in comparison to other countries. What is the basis for these claims? What are students’ actual scores and rankings? How should we interpret and use these scores? A better understanding of the evidence is important for making effective policy decisions that affect computer science and other STEM fields.

Pair Programming-in-a-Box: The Power of Collaborative Learning

Pair Programming-in-a-Box: The Power of Collaborative Learning

Pair programming is a collaborative learning method in which students program in pairs instead of individually. This approach significantly improves college students' programming competency and increases the likelihood that both male and female students become and remain computer science majors. During pair programming, students work in tandem at one computer while completing regular programming assignments. The "driver" controls the mouse and keyboard while the "navigator" makes suggestions, points out errors, and asks questions.

 

Summaries of Selected Research of SSAB Members and Visitors to 2012 NCWIT Summit

Members of the Social Science Advisory Board (SSAB) support the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) through their research and knowledge about women and information technology.  The depth and breadth of perspectives and approaches that SSAB members and visitors bring to the study of women and computing are illustrated in examples of their recent research projects.  In the research summaries that follow, we see expertise across social science fields, and theoretical and empirical issues and findings with implications for diversity and the full participation of wome

Girls in IT: The Facts (infographic)

Girls in IT: The Facts Infographic

This attention-getting infographic summarizes the key findings from the Girls in IT report. Use this piece to raise awareness about ways to increase girls' participation in computing.

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How Can Unbiased Software Facilitate Girls' Interest in IT? A Checklist for Evaluating Software (Case Study 1)

How Can Unbiased Software Facilitate Girls' Interest in IT? A Checklist for Evaluating Software (Case Study 1)

Educational software can increase students’ motivation, interest, and academic achievement in science and math. To do so, it must be selected and utilized properly to avoid gender bias. A sample tool for guiding software selection is provided.

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Offer Computing Workshops and Camps: They Benefit Both Students and the Teachers Who Offer Them

This resource for computer science teachers offers ideas for partnering, existing curriculum, and materials for implementation. Download the PDF, read the HTML version below, or use these additional resources.

How Do Stereotype Threats Affect Retention? Better Approaches to Well-Intentioned, but Harmful Messages (Case Study 1)

How Do Stereotype Threats Affect Retention? Better Approaches to Well-Intentioned, but Harmful Messages (Case Study 1)

Stereotype threat harms both performance and motivation by reducing our feelings of competence, belonging, and trust in our colleagues. However, careful thought, education, and regular assessment of diversity practices can help minimize incidents of stereotype threat. Examples show how instructors and advisors can minimize stereotype threat by creating an accepting environment where students feel at ease and are recognized for their achievements. In addition, student test scores improve and gender gaps are eliminated when students are taught that intelligence increases through effort.

University Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

University Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing, this card connect students' interests with IT and computing career paths that can be achieved through enrollment in a university or four-year college. Degree programs are linked to job titles, projected growth, and wages. Counselors for Computing (C4C) is a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance, made possible by the Merck Company Foundation.

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NCWIT Tips: 8 Ways to Give Students More Effective Feedback Using a Growth Mindset

Effective feedback gives students information they actually use to increase their learning and improve their performance. It should employ a "growth mindset" that focuses on developing intelligence through effort, practice, and "wise feedback" that spurs additional effort.

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