Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

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NCWIT provides these tools in the hopes that you will find them useful as a starting point for your own evaluations. Along with survey questions, there are interview and observation protocols. Some of the survey instruments have been validated in particular settings, and others just field-tested. Ideally, you will hire a professional evaluator to work with you, but when that is not possible, you can move forward with these tools yourself.

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The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.

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Why do some women persist in computing and others don’t?

The NCWIT "Learning from Young Women" study was a longitudinal mixed methods research project that explored this question. This longitudinal study included a large sample of women from around the United States who spanned the pipeline from high school through college through workforce over a period of six years. 
 

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Let’s Talk About Gender, Race, and Identity

Use this slide deck, with its short videos (~3 min) and discussion questions, to learn about the complexity of gender, the concept of intersectionality, and how to have productive discussions about race.

"Tech Culture Interrupted" is an engaging and provocative conversation between NCWIT social scientists (Dr. Catherine Ashcraft and Dr. Brad McLain) and a variety of special guests from the tech industry’s top leaders and innovators. The podcast explores ground-breaking research and ground-truth stories about how to build more inclusive and more innovative workplace cultures through new perspectives on leadership, community, and engagement.

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Check out the most compelling statistics on women's participation in computing on a single page.

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In honor of Black History Month (February 2020) and Women’s History Month (March 2020), NCWIT celebrates the contributions of Black women and girls in computing by hosting a three-part virtual chat: “The Color of Our Future: An Online Conversation Series on the Empowerment and Inclusion of Black Women & Girls in Tech.” The series explores Black girls in K-12, Black women in postsecondary computing education, and Black women in the tech workforce.

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Intersectionality is a critical and necessary concept to develop effective programs to broaden the participation of women and girls in computing. This resource provides a background and overview of the concept, in addition to key readings and resources related to women and girls of color in STEM and computing. 

 

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The design and décor of the physical spaces where people work contain signals about who does and who does not belong there. When we view these spaces through a diversity of perspectives, we can reveal features that signal exclusion to many people in subtle or overt ways — as well as opportunities where we can intentionally signal inclusion for a broad range of people.

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Achieving equity in the tech industry must be intersectional: race, class, gender, sexuality, and other key factors of identity shape experiences differently; and understanding those differences is critical to promoting diversity, inclusion, and change for women, girls, and other underrepresented groups in IT.

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Task assignment is a key area where bias emerges, exacerbating workplace inequity. Research shows that women and members of other underrepresented groups are more often channeled into “execution” or project management roles and are less likely to receive high-value, high-visibility, or stretch assignments (Hewlett et al., 2008; 2014). 
 
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This Guide was created to support the use of evidence-based interventions by change leaders. It can help researchers to avoid jargon and communicate effectively. This resource is intended to help readers design an overall communication strategy. Steps include identifying goals and philosophy, deciding whether to translate at all, carefully analyzing specific audiences, and based on these, developing a user-centered communication strategy.

This report, sponsored by NCWIT, adds to the relatively limited research studying patterns of women-founded, venture-backed startups. While others have tended to look at topline aggregates of venture deals and funding amounts by the gender composition of founding teams, researchers for this report track “first financings” (initial venture investments), examining first financings by founder gender over time, by industry, and across U.S. metropolitan areas. Outcomes for women-founded companies versus non-women-founded firms are also compared.

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Advancing K-16 computing education in a state is a complex and collaborative endeavor. Computing education state summits are an important part of this process and can help to develop and advance a state’s strategy both for expanding computing education access and for broadening participation in computing (BPC). In particular, summits can promote equity and democratize change efforts by giving voice to all stakeholders in a collaborative and action-oriented environment.
 

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