Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

Knowledge of computer science (CS) is fundamental to students’ future careers. This guide provides educators with context and concrete steps to build and expand inclusivity in CS education. By actively engaging students in CS, educators can build an even stronger pipeline of creativity and innovation to tackle the world’s challenges and help ensure students have the skills needed to thrive today and tomorrow.

Messaging Toolkit

NCWIT has developed a new messaging platform that emphasizes the creative potential for organizations that invest in fostering a culture where girls, women, and underrepresented groups participate with strong voices. The headline, “The idea you don’t have is the voice you haven’t heard,” and the tagline, “Inclusion changes what’s possible,” are confident expressions of what we know is true: Diversity and inclusion enhance outcomes in technological innovation for educational institutions and businesses of all sizes. 

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Mentoring programs are an excellent way to support graduate students’ sense of belonging in the local intellectual community and help them move forward in their professional careers. Everyone benefits from mentoring, including the mentors themselves, especially when both mentors and mentees are fully committed to the relationship.

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The design and décor of the physical spaces where people work contain signals about who does and who does not belong there. When we view these spaces through a diversity of perspectives, we can reveal features that signal exclusion to many people in subtle or overt ways — as well as opportunities where we can intentionally signal inclusion for a broad range of people.

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This workbook will help educators and influencers understand the research-based reasons why a diverse range of girls are less likely to take computing courses in high school. High school teachers are provided with actionable recommendations for creating recruiting and outreach interventions that work.

 

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There is consensus among researchers that encouragement matters and plays a critical role in engaging more young women and girls in computing. Here are some key highlights from published research studies, and follow-up tips on practicing encouragement.

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Achieving equity in the tech industry must be intersectional: race, class, gender, sexuality, and other key factors of identity shape experiences differently; and understanding those differences is critical to promoting diversity, inclusion, and change for women, girls, and other underrepresented groups in IT.

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Task assignment is a key area where bias emerges, exacerbating workplace inequity. Research shows that women and members of other underrepresented groups are more often channeled into “execution” or project management roles and are less likely to receive high-value, high-visibility, or stretch assignments (Hewlett et al., 2008; 2014). 
 
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This Guide was created to support the use of evidence-based interventions by change leaders. It can help researchers to avoid jargon and communicate effectively. This resource is intended to help readers design an overall communication strategy. Steps include identifying goals and philosophy, deciding whether to translate at all, carefully analyzing specific audiences, and based on these, developing a user-centered communication strategy.

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Set of eleven TECHNOLOchicas 3.0 11"x17" posters.

This report, sponsored by NCWIT, adds to the relatively limited research studying patterns of women-founded, venture-backed startups. While others have tended to look at topline aggregates of venture deals and funding amounts by the gender composition of founding teams, researchers for this report track “first financings” (initial venture investments), examining first financings by founder gender over time, by industry, and across U.S. metropolitan areas. Outcomes for women-founded companies versus non-women-founded firms are also compared.

Modern Figures Podcast

Modern Figures Podcast (http://modernfigurespodcast.com/) guest stars Black women in computing who share their stories and perspectives on technical, societal, and personal topics. Geared toward women of color in STEM, especially high school and college students, the podcast also highlights the interestingly relatable, pivotal moments along their journey in computing. 

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Advancing K-16 computing education in a state is a complex and collaborative endeavor. Computing education state summits are an important part of this process and can help to develop and advance a state’s strategy both for expanding computing education access and for broadening participation in computing (BPC). In particular, summits can promote equity and democratize change efforts by giving voice to all stakeholders in a collaborative and action-oriented environment.
 

Did you know some of your greatest allies in advocating for computer science (CS) might work right alongside you every day? CS educators across the nation are finding that collaborating with their school counselors yields positive results in directing students to viable education and career opportunities.

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