Resources

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Supervisors as Change Agents

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Supervisors as Change Agents

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Supervisors as Change Agents is for supervisors who wish to become change agents in their organizations. The materials are focused on actions that you as an individual supervisor can take to raise awareness and motivate change. Of course, supervisors cannot “do it all,” but these individual efforts are often what it takes to spark change. The materials here also point to other NCWIT resources that can help with planning more systemic, department, or company-wide change at later stages.

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Globaloria: Students Designing Educational Games (Case Study 7)

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects. Globaloria is the country’s largest social learning network of schools and community centers using a game design curriculum to develop students’ digital literacies, computing knowledge, and global citizenship skills.

How Do You Retain Women through Inclusive Pedagogy? Designing for Diversity (Case Study 2)

How Do You Retain Women through Inclusive Pedagogy? Designing for Diversity (Case Study 2)

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students. A new, smaller introductory computer science class tailored for inexperienced students at the University of Virginia recruited more minority and women students and resulted in many more students declaring a major in computer science.

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Offer Computing Workshops and Camps: They Benefit Both Students and the Teachers Who Offer Them

This resource for computer science teachers offers ideas for partnering, existing curriculum, and materials for implementation. Download the PDF, read the HTML version below, or use these additional resources.

NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing: Award Recipient

NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing: Award Recipient (Online Badge)

Display the "NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing: Award Recipient" badge at your site.

How Can Leader-Member Relationships Promote Women's Retention and Advancement? Taking Stock of Leader-Member Relationships (Case Study 1)

How Can Leader-Member Relationships Promote Women's Retention and Advancement? Taking Stock of Leader-Member Relationships (Case Study 1)

Positive leader-member relationships are characterized by exchanges of trust, respect, and low formality. They measurably improve performance, job satisfaction, and commitment. This practice sheet offers sample survey items to help with conducting "relationship audits" that can be used for benchmarking the quality of leader-member relationships in an organization.

Military Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Military Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing, this card connect students' interests with opportunities in IT and computing that can be achieved through military service and beyond. Information about IT military assignments is linked to future jobs and salaries. Counselors for Computing (C4C) is a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance, made possible by the Merck Company Foundation.

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Gotta Have IT

Gotta Have IT is an all-in-one computing resource kit designed with educators' needs in mind. A select set of high-quality posters, computing and careers information, digital media and more, the resource kit builds awareness and inspires interest in computing.

Gotta Have IT is for all students, but is especially inclusive of girls. Read more about these resources here.

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Results of a Large-Scale, Multi-Institutional Study of Undergraduate Retention in Computing

The recent upsurge in enrollments in computing means that student attrition has a substantial opportunity cost. Admitting a student who leaves both reduces graduation yield and prevents another equally qualified student from enrolling. Professors cannot change the background of students, but they can control many aspects of student experience in the computing major. This paper presents the results of a study to understand strongest predictors of retention in undergraduate computing based on a large-scale survey administered in 14 U.S.

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Meet Them Where They Are (Case Study 3)

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Meet Them Where They Are (Case Study 3)

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects. The Girl Scouts’ “Technobile” is a mobile technology classroom with 12 workstations. It showcases technology and technology careers in ways that appeal to girls, while breaking down the access barriers to IT.

Roadshow-in-a-Box: Capitalizing on Models for Outreach

Roadshow-in-a-Box: Capitalizing on Models for Outreach

Roadshow-in-a-Box is a complete set of resources developed for colleges and universities wanting to establish or enhance their roadshow outreach programs. It draws on the wisdom and practices of a variety of successful roadshow programs that focus on recruiting for diversity and put trained student presenters in a leading role. The Box includes program advice, templates, and sample materials to aid your efforts in every aspect of a sustainable roadshow program. Components include: Controlled Message, Support, Ongoing School Partnerships, Trained Student Presenters, Program Activities, and Evaluation and Tracking.

Promising Practices Catalog

Promising Practices Catalog

This document presents very brief summaries of promising and effective practices identified by NCWIT social scientists and will evolve as more practices are developed and recognized. The practices summarized here aim to 1) Increase the numbers of girls and women in computing. They have goals or benefits related to recruiting, retaining, or advancing the diverse range of females. 2) Make diversity in computing matter to individuals, organizations, and society. They have goals or benefits related to innovation, communication, and talent development.

Why Should Young People Consider Careers in Information Technology?

Created for school counselors by Counselors for Computing (C4C), a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance made possible by the Merck Company Foundation, this card gives adults talking points and additional resources for a conversation with their students, children, and/or other young people. The main message is that IT offers meaningful work, security and high salaries with a bachelor’s degree, and flexibility and variety. Information is provided to address these specific questions: What should you tell a young person about a career in IT?

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