Resources

Thumbnail Image

Women in IT: The Facts (2015 Update)

One of NCWIT’s most popular reports has been updated for 2015. See what’s changed and what hasn’t. Women in IT: The Facts brings together the latest findings from recent research on technical women including the current state of affairs for technical women, a summary of the key barriers to women's participation in technology, promising practices for addressing these barriers, and tools to support your organization's change efforts.

How Do Admissions Criteria Affect Women's Representation in Graduate Computing? Attempts to Equalize a Subjective Process (Case Study 1)

How Do Admissions Criteria Affect Women's Representation in Graduate Computing? Attempts to Equalize a Subjective Process (Case Study 1)

When admission committee members minimize the biasing effects of stereotypes and consider applicants’ membership in an under-represented group as a positive characteristic, they promote diversity. By looking carefully at women and considering their life experiences, University of California, San Diego and University of California, Berkeley admit more women students than their peer institutions.

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Performance Review/Talent Management

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Performance Review/Talent Management

Supervising-in-a-Box: Performance Review/Talent Management provides supervisors with resources for reducing biases in performance evaluation and talent management systems. This “Box” includes tip sheets, resources for identifying and reducing biases, templates, evaluation tools, key takeaways, and background information on unconscious biases.

Gender and Computing Conference Papers

More than 40 years of data on authors of ACM conference papers describe women’s contribution to this important aspect of computing professional life. The data show that women’s authorship increased substantially over time, and that relative to their representation in the likely pool of ACM conference paper authors, women Ph.D.s were especially productive. Initial tests indicate that the increase in women’s share of papers was due in large part to the increase in number of women in the community of potential authors.

 

NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology

The February 2011 National Girls Collaborative Project Webinar, NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology, is archived at the NGCP website. This webcast highlights free materials and information for attracting more girls and underrepresented groups to computing and information technology and shares how formal and informal educators are using these resources to strengthen programming for girls. An archive of the webinar and the final powerpoint slides are available for viewing:

Cover Image

e-Textiles-in-a-Box

Use the e-Textiles-in-a-Box tutorial and get ready to teach young people about electronics and computing. Based on the Computational Textiles Curriculum and Sew Electric from MIT, e-Textiles-in-a-Box provides instructions for sewing soft circuits and programming an Arduino microprocessor on the way to creating a bookmark book light and an interactive felt monster that lights up and sings. NCWIT is pleased to offer e-Textiles-in-a-Box in cooperation with the MIT High-Low Tech Group, and with funding from the National Science Foundation.

How Do You Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy? The Conversational Classroom (Case Study 1)

How Do You Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy? The Conversational Classroom (Case Study 1)

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students. Professor William Waite abstained from lecturing his students on assigned reading and relied instead on the students to direct the information discussed in the classroom.

A practical model for achieving gender parity in undergraduate computing: Change the system, not the student.

This paper presents a systemic change model of undergraduate computing for accomplishing gender parity. Rather than view women as needing to be modified or repaired to fit the system, this model advocates changing the system to fit the needs of a wider range of students. Changing the system is a more sustainable approach to creating gender parity than providing extra support to students with less experience or background or students who are less likely to feel that people like themselves belong in computing.

NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award: Recipient

NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award: Recipient (Online Badge)

Display the "NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award: Recipient" badge at your site.

How Can Companies Promote Innovation with Diverse Employees? Patenting Learning Communities (Case Study 1)

How Can Companies Promote Innovation with Diverse Employees? Patenting Learning Communities (Case Study 1)

Diverse work teams can improve innovation, problem-solving, and productivity. Patenting is one important measure of recognized and rewarded innovation efforts in IT, but female patenting rates are quite low. A few companies have started patenting or innovation communities to increase women’s participation. In order to reap the benefits of diverse innovation, two companies implement “inventor learning communities” to increase female participation in innovation and patenting.

Talking Points

Institutional Barriers & Their Effects: How can I talk to colleagues about these issues?

Institutional barriers (IBs) are policies, procedures, or situations that systematically disadvantage certain groups of people. IBs exist in any majority-minority group situation. When an initial population is fairly similar (e.g., in male-dominated professions), systems naturally emerge to meet the needs of this population. If these systems do not change with the times, they can inhibit the success of new members with different needs. IBs often seem natural or “just the way things are around here.”

Supervising-in-a-Box Image

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Full Series

Employees report that the supervisory relationship is one of the most significant factors in their decision to leave or stay with an organization. Are you, as a supervisor, adequately prepared for this responsibility?

Even if your institution already has a formal training program for supervisors, use Supervising-in-a-Box to create highly productive teams that reduce employee turnover, capitalize on diverse innovative thinking, and ultimately strengthen their bottom lines.

Top 10 Ways Cover Image

Top 10 Ways to Increase Girls' Participation in Computing Competitions

Are you interested in getting more girls involved in your computing competition? This Top 10 resource offers simple suggestions to make your competition appeal to a wider range of participants. Taking these steps will benefit all students and help make your event a success. 

View Online

How Do Stereotype Threats Affect Retention? Better Approaches to Well-Intentioned, but Harmful Messages (Case Study 1)

How Do Stereotype Threats Affect Retention? Better Approaches to Well-Intentioned, but Harmful Messages (Case Study 1)

Stereotype threat harms both performance and motivation by reducing our feelings of competence, belonging, and trust in our colleagues. However, careful thought, education, and regular assessment of diversity practices can help minimize incidents of stereotype threat. Examples show how instructors and advisors can minimize stereotype threat by creating an accepting environment where students feel at ease and are recognized for their achievements. In addition, student test scores improve and gender gaps are eliminated when students are taught that intelligence increases through effort.

Pages