Resources

Girls in IT: The Facts (infographic)

Girls in IT: The Facts Infographic

This attention-getting infographic summarizes the key findings from the Girls in IT report. Use this piece to raise awareness about ways to increase girls' participation in computing.

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Interrupting Bias in Academic Settings

Use this resource to help you practice ways to interrupt bias in real-life situations.

Use the orange button to download a printable copy of this resource and facilitation guide.

Communicating for Change: Persuade Colleagues to Get on Board

Communicating for Change: Persuade Colleagues to Get on Board

Changing the culture of an organization to one that promotes women’s participation in computing requires that members reach new understandings and act in new ways. Enlisting allies in this process requires persuasive communication. This resource provides guidance on the four distinct and necessary steps for the long-term process of effective persuasion.

For more information on the Extension Services program, visit ncwit.org/extensionservices.

Top 10 Ways Successful Technical Women Increase Their Visibility

Top 10 Ways Successful Technical Women Increase Their Visibility

Increasing your visibility is important for advancing your career. This list includes ten things that highly successful women say they do in order to increase their visibility throughout the company, industry, and technical community.

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Male Advocates and Allies (report cover)

Male Advocates and Allies: Promoting Gender Diversity in Technology Workplaces

This report, sponsored by NCWIT's Workforce Alliance, provides an inside look into how men think about and advocate for diversity in the technical workplace. Drawing from interviews with 47 men in technical companies and departments, this study: 1) Identifies the factors that motivate or hinder men in advocating for gender diversity, 2) explores what diversity efforts men have experienced as successful or unsuccessful, and 3) identifies specific strategies to increase men's participation in advocacy.

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How Can Reducing Unconscious Bias Increase Women’s Success in IT?

Research shows that even individuals committed to equality harbor unconscious biases that impact everyday decisions and interactions. In the IT workplace, unconscious gender bias can mislead employers, both male and female, to make inaccurate judgments in hiring, performance reviews, and promotion.

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Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women Guide

Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women Guide

Managers and others can use this guide to find NCWIT resources that will help them create highly-productive, diverse technical teams. Resources are catalogued by the key “change areas” identified in the NCWIT Change Model for Industry: 1) Top Leadership Support, 2) Supervisory Relationships, 3) Recruitment and Selection, 4) Talent Development and Mentoring, 5) Performance Evaluation and Promotion, 6) Support for Competing Responsibilities, 7) Reduction of Subtle Biases, and 8) Ongoing Evaluation.  Space also exists for adding company-specific resources into the guide.

Community College Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Community College Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing, this card connect students' interests with IT and computing career paths that can be achieved through enrollment in a community college. Degrees are linked to job titles, projected growth, and wages. Counselors for Computing (C4C) is a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance, made possible by the Merck Company Foundation.

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Counselor Lesson Plan (PowerPoint)

Use these PowerPoint slides in combination with the Counselor Lesson Plan (PDF) to introduce middle and high school students to computing and careers.

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How Do You Mentor Technical Women at Work?

Paired mentors and protégés exchange advice for career advancement and reduced turnover. Formal mentoring programs may include organized activities that provide a framework for the mentor-protégé relationship and can lead to more rapid career advancement and higher career satisfaction for participants than non-participants.

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Top 10 Ways to be an Effective Sponsor

Sponsors can make a world of difference in anyone's career, but research shows that they can be especially important for female or other employees who are a minority in a majority-group environment. Use these tips to identify protégés and to be an effective sponsor.

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The State of Social Science Research on Gender and IT Entrepreneurship: A Summary of Research Literature on Women’s Entrepreneurship in the Information Technology Field

Entrepreneurial Series Report #5 summarizes research literature on women's entrepreneurship in the information technology field with a focus on social science research.

NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology

The February 2011 National Girls Collaborative Project Webinar, NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology, is archived at the NGCP website. This webcast highlights free materials and information for attracting more girls and underrepresented groups to computing and information technology and shares how formal and informal educators are using these resources to strengthen programming for girls. An archive of the webinar and the final powerpoint slides are available for viewing:

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How Do You Support Completion of Graduate Degrees and Engender Commitment to a Research Career?

Students most likely to complete their graduate studies are those who are viewed as junior colleagues in a positive relationship with their advisors and who are well integrated into their department’s or lab’s intellectual community.

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Broadening Participation by Supporting Great Teaching

This is the first of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing. This article focuses on informal ways of encouraging student interaction as a means to building positive, inclusive student community. It also includes information on how faculty can contribute to the collection and serve as reviewers.

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