Resources

More than 160 NCWIT research-based resources raise awareness, increase knowledge, and build capacity for individuals and organizations to reach out to critical populations and implement systemic change. NCWIT provides resources for reform at every level — K-12, postsecondary, industry — that are attractive, easy-to-use, free, and available in both electronic and print formats.

 

Communicating for Change: Persuade Colleagues to Get on Board

Communicating for Change: Persuade Colleagues to Get on Board

Changing the culture of an organization to one that promotes women’s participation in computing requires that members reach new understandings and act in new ways. Enlisting allies in this process requires persuasive communication. This resource provides guidance on the four distinct and necessary steps for the long-term process of effective persuasion.

For more information on the Extension Services program, visit ncwit.org/extensionservices.

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NCWIT Tips: 11 Ways to Design More Inclusive Academic Websites

Your computing department’s website is an important source of information for current and prospective students. These tips will help you create a website that welcomes diverse students and effectively promotes computing and your department.

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Summaries of Selected Research of SSAB Members and Visitors to 2012 NCWIT Summit

Members of the Social Science Advisory Board (SSAB) support the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) through their research and knowledge about women and information technology.  The depth and breadth of perspectives and approaches that SSAB members and visitors bring to the study of women and computing are illustrated in examples of their recent research projects.  In the research summaries that follow, we see expertise across social science fields, and theoretical and empirical issues and findings with implications for diversity and the full participation of wome

Pair Programming-in-a-Box: The Power of Collaborative Learning

Pair Programming-in-a-Box: The Power of Collaborative Learning

Pair programming is a collaborative learning method in which students program in pairs instead of individually. This approach significantly improves college students' programming competency and increases the likelihood that both male and female students become and remain computer science majors. During pair programming, students work in tandem at one computer while completing regular programming assignments. The "driver" controls the mouse and keyboard while the "navigator" makes suggestions, points out errors, and asks questions.

Gotta Have IT cover

Gotta Have IT

Gotta Have IT is an all-in-one computing resource kit designed with educators' needs in mind. A select set of high-quality posters, computing and careers information, digital media and more, the resource kit builds awareness and inspires interest in computing.

Gotta Have IT is for all students, but is especially inclusive of girls. Read more about these resources here.

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How Do You Retain Women through Collaborative Learning?

Collaborative learning can improve retention rates, critical thinking, appreciation of diversity, and development of social and professional skills. When implementing collaborative learning, match students roughly according to experience levels and make sure to give students opportunities to work together for both graded and un-graded assignments.

View the research

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Collaborating to Grow the Pathway of Native Americans in STEM: White Paper

Intel, in partnership with NCWIT, hosted Growing the Legacy of Native American Leadership in Science and Technology: A Thought Leadership Event. Key leaders in academia, government, tribal nations, non-profit organizations, and the tech industry convened to discuss the state of technology in Native American communities, identify gaps, and create actionable steps for increasing Native American student participation and retention in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education.

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Mission Possible (24"x36" poster)

Students see just ten of the many ways computer science is making the world a better place. Encourage them to imagine more.

This poster is one of three Counselors for Computing (C4C) posters, developed in collaboration with CareerswithCode.com and produced by Refraction Media: ncwit.org/CwCposters.

University Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

University Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing, this card connect students' interests with IT and computing career paths that can be achieved through enrollment in a university or four-year college. Degree programs are linked to job titles, projected growth, and wages. Counselors for Computing (C4C) is a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance, made possible by the Merck Company Foundation.

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Diversity in Computing: Why It Matters and How Organizations Can Achieve It

Computing-related jobs are interesting, well-paying, secure, and abundant, so why aren't more women working in this creative field that produces the technology that is central to our daily lives?

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How Can Reducing Unconscious Bias Increase Women’s Success in IT?

Research shows that even individuals committed to equality harbor unconscious biases that impact everyday decisions and interactions. In the IT workplace, unconscious gender bias can mislead employers, both male and female, to make inaccurate judgments in hiring, performance reviews, and promotion.

View the research

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What are the Important Components of Targeted Recruiting?

Targeted recruiting means planning strategically: set quantifiable goals; identify large, capable audiences; personalize the content of your message; deliver that message in media that are relevant to your audience; and pay attention to people who influence your audience’s decision-making.

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Resources for Increasing Participation and Transparency in Patenting

Patenting processes are often unclear, making it difficult for employees to know when an idea, process, or product should be patented or how they might go about doing so. These difficulties are exacerbated for women and other underrepresented patent filers who often lack access to informal networks that typically help people navigate this labyrinth.

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Top 10 Ways to Engage School Counselors as Allies in the Effort to Increase Student Access to Computer Science Education and Careers

School counselors are eager to direct students to viable education and career opportunities. Consider these key points for collaboration as you plan to meet with counselors to discuss ways their professional responsibilities align with your goals to increase student access to computing.

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