Resources

More than 160 NCWIT research-based resources raise awareness, increase knowledge, and build capacity for individuals and organizations to reach out to critical populations and implement systemic change. NCWIT provides resources for reform at every level — K-12, postsecondary, industry — that are attractive, easy-to-use, free, and available in both electronic and print formats.

 

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10 Actionable Ways to Actually Increase Diversity in Tech

Tech's diversity problem is not new information, especially to those of us who work in the industry. There is a trend taking hold in tech companies over the past few years: publishing diversity stats. While taking a hard look in the mirror is an important step in addressing diversity issues, taking additional steps to implement meaningful change efforts is also important. But what steps are most effective?

By the Numbers

By the Numbers

Check out the most compelling statistics on women's participation in computing on a single page.

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NCWIT Tips: 8 Ways to Give Employees More Effective Feedback Using a Growth Mindset

Effective feedback gives employees information they can realistically use to increase their learning and improve their performance. It abandons a "fixed mindset" that sees skills as "innate abilities" and instead employs a "growth mindset" that sees skills as developed through continued effort and practice.

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How Do You Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy?

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students.

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Moving Beyond Computer Literacy: Why schools should teach computer science

Moving Beyond Computer Literacy: Why schools should teach computer science

Computer Science — not computer literacy — underlies most innovation today, yet the majority of U.S. schools require only that students use computers. Computer science teaches students design, logical reasoning, and problem solving — all valuable well beyond the computer science classroom. This resource provides information about the value of computer science curriculum for students, educators, local and national economies as well as global society. It offers steps schools can take to successfully incorporate computer science education.

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REU-In-A-Box: Expanding the Pool of Computing Researchers

REU-in-A-Box: Expanding the Pool of Computing Researchers explains the benefits of undergraduate research in computing with content developed by experienced computing faculty mentors and undergraduate researchers. This resource focuses on the interactions of a faculty mentor with one or a few students and the processes by which they conduct and share the outcomes of their research. 

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Top 10 Ways to Hire the Best for Your Computing Start-up

This Top 10 resource offers recommendations for attracting and hiring highly qualified diverse technical employees into start-up companies. The recommendations include attention to casting a wide inclusive net, stereotyped language and decor, as well as some more cutting-edge approaches.

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How to Create and Sustain a Women in Computing Group on Your Campus

Women's groups can help to retain students and can provide an infrastructure for local activism. This brief guide discusses how to get a group started and to build its structure, the importance of maintaining an open and public presence, possible activities, ways to build membership, and the value of affiliating with other groups.

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Resources for Change Agents

This guide, created by the Extension Services program, helps you find resources for attracting undergraduate women into computing and retaining them through graduation, including tools for assessing your efforts. For more information on the Extension Services program, visit https://www.ncwit.org/project/extension-services-undergraduate-programs.

NCWIT Tips for Writing Better Job Ads

NCWIT Tips for Writing Better Job Ads

These tips provide “before and after” examples of ads with balanced language and other guidelines for writing unbiased job descriptions.

View the NCWIT Checklist for Reducing Unconscious Bias in Job Descriptions/Advertisements.

 

 

NCWIT Checklist for Reducing Unconscious Bias in Job Descriptions/Advertisements

NCWIT Checklist for Reducing Unconscious Bias in Job Descriptions/Advertisements

This Job Description Checklist helps you analyze ads for subtle biases in language, in criteria, and in how you describe your workplace.

View NCWIT Tips for Writing Better Job Ads.

 

 

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Summary of Recent Research on Gender and High-tech Start-ups

High-tech startups typically use one of five types of employment models, reflecting their founders’ ideas about hiring and managing employees. These models can have long-lasting effects on firms and predict the trajectory of women’s representation among core technical staff. This research paper looks at the five models, identifies which are most congenial to hiring women, and points out correlations between competitive business models and meritocratic hiring. 

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Top 10 Ways of Recruiting High School Women into Your Computing Classes

Recruiting diverse students to computing requires that you spark their interest, build their confidence they can succeed, create a community where they feel like they belong, and help them see themselves as a "computing person." This Top 10 list offers practices that help you recruit high school girls to your computing courses.

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How Can You Re-Engineer Your Undergraduate Program to Increase Women's Representation in Computing? Small Steps Toward Systemic Change (Case Study 1)

How Can You Re-Engineer Your Undergraduate Program to Increase Women’s Representation in Computing?

The socio-educational system a student experiences shapes participation in the major. Altering one element of that system is often not enough to create enduring change. When faculty members are ready to implement organizational innovation, success is more likely if they receive support from institutional leaders, have access to adequate resources, and are able to participate in decision-making about the change.

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