Resources

Which computing majors are right for me?

Which computing majors are right for me?

This card, co-branded with ACM, explains how computing interests and talents line up with different undergraduate degrees and the careers that follow.

A practical model for achieving gender parity in undergraduate computing: Change the system, not the student.

This paper presents a systemic change model of undergraduate computing for accomplishing gender parity. Rather than view women as needing to be modified or repaired to fit the system, this model advocates changing the system to fit the needs of a wider range of students. Changing the system is a more sustainable approach to creating gender parity than providing extra support to students with less experience or background or students who are less likely to feel that people like themselves belong in computing.

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NCWIT Tips: 13 Tips for Having Conversations About Flexible Work Options: For Managers

The first step toward an effective flexible workplace is for managers to create an environment where employees feel they can discuss available work-life options without being stigmatized. These tips can help managers create such an environment, followed by additional tips for actually having these conversations with employees.

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Talking Points

Comparing U.S. K-12 Students' Math and Science Performance Internationally: What are the facts, what do they mean for educational reform, and how do I talk effectively about the issues?

In the popular press and in public debate, one often hears that U.S. students are performing poorly in math and science in comparison to other countries. What is the basis for these claims? What are students’ actual scores and rankings? How should we interpret and use these scores? A better understanding of the evidence is important for making effective policy decisions that affect computer science and other STEM fields.

Gender Differences in Firm Size, Growth, and Persistence: A Review of Research Literature on Women's Entrepreneurship in the Information Technology Field

Entrepreneurial Series Report #1 summarizes research literature on women's entrepreneurship in the information technology field with a focus on gender differences in firm size, growth, and persistence.

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How Does Engaging Curriculum Attract Students to Computing?

Making curricula more relevant to students, introducing collaborative learning into the classroom, and tailoring courses to different student experience levels benefit female as well as male students. 

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How Does the Physical Environment Affect Women’s Entry and Persistence in Computing?

The décor of physical spaces conveys messages about the kinds of people who belong there and the kinds of activities that should be done there. Understanding this influence allows us to actively craft an environment that makes a broad range of people feel welcome in computing.

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Tapestry Workshop-in-a-Box

Tapestry Workshop-in-a-Box contains materials for organizing professional development workshops that train high school educators in research-based, field-tested ways to attract and retain more and diverse students to computing courses. This Box includes information about the objectives and content of a Tapestry Workshop; advice on logistics and budgeting; suggestions for selecting participants and presenters; and a sample agenda, templates, and evaluation tools.

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Performance Review/Talent Management

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Performance Review/Talent Management

Supervising-in-a-Box: Performance Review/Talent Management provides supervisors with resources for reducing biases in performance evaluation and talent management systems. This “Box” includes tip sheets, resources for identifying and reducing biases, templates, evaluation tools, key takeaways, and background information on unconscious biases.

Gender and Computing Conference Papers

More than 40 years of data on authors of ACM conference papers describe women’s contribution to this important aspect of computing professional life. The data show that women’s authorship increased substantially over time, and that relative to their representation in the likely pool of ACM conference paper authors, women Ph.D.s were especially productive. Initial tests indicate that the increase in women’s share of papers was due in large part to the increase in number of women in the community of potential authors.

How Can You Re-Engineer Your Undergraduate Program to Increase Women's Representation in Computing? Small Steps Toward Systemic Change (Case Study 1)

How Can You Re-Engineer Your Undergraduate Program to Increase Women’s Representation in Computing?

The socio-educational system a student experiences shapes participation in the major. Altering one element of that system is often not enough to create enduring change. When faculty members are ready to implement organizational innovation, success is more likely if they receive support from institutional leaders, have access to adequate resources, and are able to participate in decision-making about the change.

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NCWIT Tips: 8 Ways to Give Students More Effective Feedback Using a Growth Mindset

Effective feedback gives students information they actually use to increase their learning and improve their performance. It should employ a "growth mindset" that focuses on developing intelligence through effort, practice, and "wise feedback" that spurs additional effort.

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