Thumbnail Image

How Do You Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy?

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students.

View the research


Survey-in-a-Box: Student Experience of the Major (2015 Update)

Use the Survey-in-a-Box: Student Experience of the Major (SEM) to identify strengths and areas for improving your department’s efforts to retain students. The Survey-in-a-Box contains a full survey, with specific modules that can be used together or independently; an instruction manual; guidelines for getting human research approval when needed; information on how to administer paper and online versions of the survey; suggestions for action based on survey results; and much more. 

Preview Image

NCWIT Tips: 8 Ways to Increase Male Advocacy

Once you have identified potential advocates, use these tips to increase their advocacy. These ideas and quotes are drawn from research NCWIT conducted with male advocates in technical workplaces. Tips range from ways of raising awareness to technologies for encouraging activism.

View online.

Cover Image

Recruiting, Retaining, and Advancing a Diverse Technical Workforce: Data Collection and Strategic Planning Guidelines

Developing a diverse workforce must be treated like any other critical business issue. Use this guide to help you collect important data and develop a strategic plan for increasing the meaningful participation of diverse groups in your organization.

How can I prepare for a computing major?

How can I prepare for a computing major?

Produced with the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA), this card gives computing-specific advice for the steps to take on the path from high school to college.

Preview Image

Top 10 Ways Families Can Encourage Girls' Interest in Computing

Technology is a fast-growing, high-paying, creative field. Here are 10 ways that you, as a family member, can encourage the girls in your life to study, and have a career in, computer science and related technology fields.

View Online



Are you an NCWIT Alliance Member heading to a conference, workshop, or meetup? Take NCWIT with you.

NCWIT2GO is your one-stop shop for NCWIT resources in three simple steps:

Video Screenshot

Unconscious Bias and Why It Matters For Women and Tech

Learn about some of the hidden barriers that often prevent technical organizations from hiring and retaining top talent. This video will take you through a series of engaging, interactive experiments that introduce the concept of unconscious bias and explain why this information is vital for technical companies to understand. The video will also point to free NCWIT resources you can use to address these hidden barriers in order to better attract and retain a diverse workforce that will drive future innovation.

What are the Important Components of Targeted Recruiting? Change the Gender Composition of High School Computing Courses (Case Study 2)

What Are the Important Components of Targeted Recruiting? Change the Gender Composition of High School Computing Courses (Case Study 2)

Targeted recruiting means planning strategically: set quantifiable goals; identify large, capable audiences; personalize the content of your message; deliver that message in media that are relevant to your audience; and pay attention to people who influence your audience’s decision-making. High school computer science teachers who actively recruit girls and minority students report more students overall and more female students in their courses.

Preview Image

NCWIT Tips: 7 Tips for Conducting Inclusive Faculty Searches

Subtle barriers might be preventing you from hiring the best available candidates. These tips will help you conduct inclusive searches that appeal to women and people from other underrepresented groups.

View online.

Moving Beyond Computer Literacy: Why schools should teach computer science

Moving Beyond Computer Literacy: Why schools should teach computer science

Computer Science — not computer literacy — underlies most innovation today, yet the majority of U.S. schools require only that students use computers. Computer science teaches students design, logical reasoning, and problem solving — all valuable well beyond the computer science classroom. This resource provides information about the value of computer science curriculum for students, educators, local and national economies as well as global society. It offers steps schools can take to successfully incorporate computer science education.

Girls in IT: The Facts (report)

Girls in IT: The Facts

Girls in IT: The Facts, sponsored by NCWIT's K-12 Alliance, is a synthesis of the existing literature on increasing girls’ participation in computing. It aims to bring together this latest research so that readers can gain a clearer and more coherent picture of 1) the current state of affairs for girls in computing, 2) the key barriers to increasing girls’ participation in these fields, and 3) promising practices for addressing these barriers.

NCWIT PockIT Facts Logo

NCWIT PockIT Facts (mobile app)

NCWIT PockIT Facts delivers statistics about women and girls in technology as shareable infographics. Each fact links to full reports available at the NCWIT website. Discover resources and best practices for improving gender diversity in technology in schools, universities, and businesses.

Search the Apple App Store or the Android Apps on Google Play for "NCWIT" or "PockIT."



Preview Image

NCWIT Tips: 8 Tips for Announcing Your Workforce Diversity Numbers

Releasing the diversity demographics of your technical workforce is important for stimulating open conversation and measuring efforts to increase diversity in your organization. These tips will help you plan the release of this data and take follow-up steps to implement meaningful change efforts toward increasing diversity.

View online.

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Scalable Game Design for Middle School (Case Study 6)

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Scalable Game Design for Middle School (Case Study 6)

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects. The middle school computing curriculum in Colorado’s Boulder Valley School District uses Scalable Game Design to introduce computer programming.