Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

 

Which gender differences matter for high-tech entrepreneurship? (Published in Open Source Business Resource, July 2011)

This article was published in Open Source Business Resource. With data from successful founders of high-tech companies, we identify traits common to large majorities of them and any gender differences in those traits. There are few. Further, we identify criteria that might lead to gender imbalance among successful founders by comparing similarities and differences in the gender distribution of these traits among the general population and among successful founders.

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3.0 TECHNOLOchicas Posters - Set of Eleven (11"x17")

Set of eleven TECHNOLOchicas 3.0 11"x17" posters.

Gearing Up for Change

Gearing Up for Change: Institutional Reform in Undergraduate Computing Programs

Change agents must understand and consider their organization’s complex and interlocking systems. Plans for change must ensure that subsystems work in harmony with each other to reinforce the envisioned change. This resource outlines the prerequisites to transforming for diversity in undergraduate computing and explains NCWIT’s Extension Services for Undergraduate Programs (ES-UP).

A practical model for achieving gender parity in undergraduate computing: Change the system, not the student.

This paper presents a systemic change model of undergraduate computing for accomplishing gender parity. Rather than view women as needing to be modified or repaired to fit the system, this model advocates changing the system to fit the needs of a wider range of students. Changing the system is a more sustainable approach to creating gender parity than providing extra support to students with less experience or background or students who are less likely to feel that people like themselves belong in computing.

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NCWIT Tips: 8 Ways to Identify Male Advocates

Use these tips to identify likely male advocates. Also use this resource to spark discussion or role-play how you might put these tips into action in your own organization. These ideas and quotes are taken from research NCWIT conducted with males in technical workplaces.

View online.

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How Does Combating Overt Sexism Affect Women's Retention?

Sexism has measurably harmful effects, but sexist behavior can be minimized. Instructors and supervisors can practice zero tolerance and facilitate positive peer interactions, and they can provide highly visible leadership, policies, and procedures that go beyond legalities to explicitly denounce sexism.

View the research

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Computer Science-in-a-Box: Unplug Your Curriculum (2018 Update)

Computer Science-in-a-Box: Unplug Your Curriculum introduces fundamental building blocks of computer science -- without using computers. Use it with students ages 9 to 14 to teach lessons about how computers work, while addressing critical mathematics and science concepts such as number systems, algorithms, and manipulating variables and logic.

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Creating Inclusive Computer Science (CS) Programs for Youth Training Webinar

How can library staff attract girls to their coding and maker programs? This webinar by NCWIT Senior Research Scientist Lecia Barker and Homer, Alaska Youth Services Librarian Claudia Haines describes reasons girls may shy away from these programs and gives some practical advice for identifying target audiences and their influencers, messaging that addresses four important factors that affect involvement, and ways of making programs visible. 

Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women Guide

Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women Guide

Managers and others can use this guide to find NCWIT resources that will help them create highly-productive, diverse technical teams. Resources are catalogued by the key “change areas” identified in the NCWIT Change Model for Industry: 1) Top Leadership Support, 2) Supervisory Relationships, 3) Recruitment and Selection, 4) Talent Development and Mentoring, 5) Performance Evaluation and Promotion, 6) Support for Competing Responsibilities, 7) Reduction of Subtle Biases, and 8) Ongoing Evaluation.  Space also exists for adding company-specific resources into the guide.

Gender Differences in Firm Size, Growth, and Persistence: A Review of Research Literature on Women's Entrepreneurship in the Information Technology Field

Entrepreneurial Series Report #1 summarizes research literature on women's entrepreneurship in the information technology field with a focus on gender differences in firm size, growth, and persistence.

NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing Application Poster

2020 NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing Poster (11"x17")

The NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing (AiC) honors 9th-12th grade students who self-identify as women, genderqueer, or non-binary for their computing-related achievements and interests, and encourages them to pursue their passions. Use this poster to spread the word! Find out more at www.aspirations.org.

 

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How Can Encouragement Increase Persistence in Computing?

Encouragement increases self-efficacy, which is the belief in one’s ability to successfully perform a task. Because we are more likely to engage in tasks that we believe we can perform successfully, encouragement may be especially useful for attracting women to male-stereotyped fields such as computing.

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Results of a Large-Scale, Multi-Institutional Study of Undergraduate Retention in Computing

The recent upsurge in enrollments in computing means that student attrition has a substantial opportunity cost. Admitting a student who leaves both reduces graduation yield and prevents another equally qualified student from enrolling. Professors cannot change the background of students, but they can control many aspects of student experience in the computing major. This paper presents the results of a study to understand strongest predictors of retention in undergraduate computing based on a large-scale survey administered in 14 U.S.

 

Get girls into computing: Free, evidence-based materials from the National Center for Women & Information Technology (published in Journal for Computing Teachers, Summer 2011)

This editor-reviewed article in the Journal for Computing Teachers, Summer 2011 Edition, provides a detailed overview of the many free, easy-to-use publications available online for educators interested in attracting more students to computing.

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