Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

Preview Image

Communicating Research-based Interventions to Change Agents

This Guide was created to support the use of evidence-based interventions by change leaders. It can help researchers to avoid jargon and communicate effectively. This resource is intended to help readers design an overall communication strategy. Steps include identifying goals and philosophy, deciding whether to translate at all, carefully analyzing specific audiences, and based on these, developing a user-centered communication strategy.

Evaluating a Mentoring Program Guide

Evaluating a Mentoring Program Guide

Need help evaluating your mentoring program? This resource provides a step-by-step plan with example metrics for evaluating a workplace mentoring program (in either industry or academia). Recommendations are based on best practices in professional program evaluation. This guide can be used as a companion resource to NCWIT's Mentoring-in-a-Box: Technical Women at Work available at www.ncwit.org/imentor and NCWIT's Mentoring-in-a-Box: Women Faculty in Computing at www.ncwit.org/facultymentor.

Preview Image

NCWIT Tips: 8 Ways to Give Students More Effective Feedback Using a Growth Mindset

Effective feedback gives students information they actually use to increase their learning and improve their performance. It should employ a "growth mindset" that focuses on developing intelligence through effort, practice, and "wise feedback" that spurs additional effort.

View online.

Preview Image

How Do You Support Completion of Graduate Degrees and Engender Commitment to a Research Career?

Students most likely to complete their graduate studies are those who are viewed as junior colleagues in a positive relationship with their advisors and who are well integrated into their department’s or lab’s intellectual community.

View the research

Preview Image

Interrupting Bias in Industry Settings

Use this resource to help you practice ways to interrupt bias in real-life situations.

Preview Image

Careers With Code Magazine: August 2017 Edition

Careers with Code magazine is a guide for 14–18 year olds and anyone else interested in future careers that mix computer science with their skills, interests and passion – giving you the ability to change the world! It’s free to read online, available to order in print and updated each year.
 

Guide to Inclusive Computer Science Education: How educators can encourage and engage all students in computer science

Knowledge of computer science (CS) is fundamental to students’ future careers. This guide provides educators with context and concrete steps to build and expand inclusivity in CS education. By actively engaging students in CS, educators can build an even stronger pipeline of creativity and innovation to tackle the world’s challenges and help ensure students have the skills needed to thrive today and tomorrow.

Outreach-in-a-Box: Discovering IT

Outreach-in-a-Box: Discovering IT

A program to strengthen and diversify the IT pipeline through outreach to middle schools. Using the box, IT professionals customize and deliver a classroom presentation and engage youth in hands-on activities that inspire and inform them about opportunities in IT.

 

Gotta Have IT cover

Gotta Have IT

Gotta Have IT is an all-in-one computing resource kit designed with educators' needs in mind. A select set of high-quality posters, computing and careers information, digital media and more, the resource kit builds awareness and inspires interest in computing.

Gotta Have IT is for all students, but is especially inclusive of girls. Read more about these resources here.

Preview Image

How Can Companies Achieve Organizational Diversity?

Companies that establish organizational accountability for diversity, whether in the form of full-time diversity staff or a diversity task force, are more likely to increase the representation of women and minorities in management than companies that use only mentoring or diversity training programs. 

View the research

Preview Image

NCWIT Tips: 13 Tips for Creating and Sustaining a Women in Computing Group on Your Campus

Women in Computing (WIC) groups on college and university campuses can help reduce feelings of isolation and increase a sense of community and belonging. They can also be places where members can discuss difficulties they encounter and strategies for addressing these challenges in the larger community. But sometimes, women’s groups can also produce unintended consequences (e.g. convey the idea that women are a homogenous group or need "extra help"). Use the following tips to avoid these pitfalls and to ensure the success of your WIC group.

Pipeline-in-a-Box

Pipeline-in-a-Box: Promoting Advancement of CS/IT Students from Two-Year to Four-Year Institutions

Are you ready to transform the lives of community college students and diversify the computer science (CS) and information technology (IT) student body at four-year institutions? Let Pipeline-in-a-Box: Promoting Advancement of CS/IT Students From Two-Year to Four-Year Institutionsease the way.

University Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

University Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing, this card connect students' interests with IT and computing career paths that can be achieved through enrollment in a university or four-year college. Degree programs are linked to job titles, projected growth, and wages. This Counselors for Computing (C4C) resource was produced by the NCWIT K-12 Alliance with support from the Merck Company Foundation and Palo Alto Networks.

Preview Image

How Do You Mentor Faculty Women?

Faculty mentoring programs help junior faculty to acclimate and promote relationships that can cover a broad range of topics. These programs enhance career commitment and self-confidence in women. Successful programs initiate mentor pairings early for new faculty and formally facilitate the relationship until the mentor-protégé bond is established.

View the research

 

Which gender differences matter for high-tech entrepreneurship? (Published in Open Source Business Resource, July 2011)

This article was published in Open Source Business Resource. With data from successful founders of high-tech companies, we identify traits common to large majorities of them and any gender differences in those traits. There are few. Further, we identify criteria that might lead to gender imbalance among successful founders by comparing similarities and differences in the gender distribution of these traits among the general population and among successful founders.

Pages