Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

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Flexible work arrangements and career paths, along with re-entry training and support, can attract and retain mid-career female employees. 

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Previous research has suggested that access and exposure to computing, social supports, preparatory privilege, a sense of belonging in computing, and a computing identity all contribute to women pursuing computing as a field of study or intended career. A recent study explores what helps young women persist in computing despite the obstacles they encounter.

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An often overlooked way to broaden participation in computing is to grow a more inclusive student community and culture. A good way to build this community is to employ well-structured collaborative learning opportunities in your courses. (Remember: "well-structured" is key!) In this EngageCSEdu Inroads column, we explore Peer Instruction, a technique with a large body of supporting research, with UCSD Professor Beth Simon.

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Let’s Talk About Gender, Race, and Identity

Use this slide deck, with its short videos (~3 min) and discussion questions, to learn about the complexity of gender, the concept of intersectionality, and how to have productive discussions about race.

Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women Guide

Managers and others can use this guide to find NCWIT resources that will help them create highly-productive, diverse technical teams. Resources are catalogued by the key “change areas” identified in the NCWIT Change Model for Industry: 1) Top Leadership Support, 2) Supervisory Relationships, 3) Recruitment and Selection, 4) Talent Development and Mentoring, 5) Performance Evaluation and Promotion, 6) Support for Competing Responsibilities, 7) Reduction of Subtle Biases, and 8) Ongoing Evaluation.  Space also exists for adding company-specific resources into the guide.

Military Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing (C4C), this card connects students' interests with opportunities in IT and computing that can be achieved through military service and beyond. Information about IT military assignments is linked to future jobs and salaries. C4C is a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance, made possible by The Merck Company Foundation, Google, Palo Alto Networks, and Apple.

Male Advocates and Allies (report cover)

This report, sponsored by NCWIT's Workforce Alliance, provides an inside look into how men think about and advocate for diversity in the technical workplace. Drawing from interviews with 47 men in technical companies and departments, this study: 1) Identifies the factors that motivate or hinder men in advocating for gender diversity, 2) explores what diversity efforts men have experienced as successful or unsuccessful, and 3) identifies specific strategies to increase men's participation in advocacy.

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Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects.

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Research shows that having a sponsor increases both career satisfaction and retention; sponsorship is especially important for employees when they are a minority in a majority-group environment. Use these recommendations to identify and build relationships with potential sponsors.

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This report, sponsored by NCWIT, adds to the relatively limited research studying patterns of women-founded, venture-backed startups. While others have tended to look at topline aggregates of venture deals and funding amounts by the gender composition of founding teams, researchers for this report track “first financings” (initial venture investments), examining first financings by founder gender over time, by industry, and across U.S. metropolitan areas. Outcomes for women-founded companies versus non-women-founded firms are also compared.

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Employee Development
Supervising-in-a-Box Series helps establish supportive and effective relationships with a diverse range of employees. This box explores ways to reduce or remove unconscious bias, discriminatory practices, and institutional barriers while performing supervisory job functions – including recruitment, project management, performance evaluations, feedback processes, and everyday communication. Employee Development focuses on ensuring that employees contribute their best ideas and talents to the team.
Top 10 Ways Managers Can Retain Technical Women

This resource includes ten important recommendations supervisors can readily adopt to improve retention for all employees. They are particularly useful for retaining women and employees from underrepresented groups.

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Effective feedback gives students information they actually use to increase their learning and improve their performance. It should employ a "growth mindset" that focuses on developing intelligence through effort, practice, and "wise feedback" that spurs additional effort.

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Students most likely to complete their graduate studies are those who are viewed as junior colleagues in a positive relationship with their advisors and who are well integrated into their department’s or lab’s intellectual community.

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