Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

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Use this resource to help you practice ways to interrupt bias in real-life situations.

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This is the third of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing.

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Mentoring programs are an excellent way to support graduate students’ sense of belonging in the local intellectual community and help them move forward in their professional careers. Everyone benefits from mentoring, including the mentors themselves, especially when both mentors and mentees are fully committed to the relationship.

Community College Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing (C4C), this card connects students' interests with IT and computing career paths that can be achieved through enrollment in a community college. Degrees are linked to job titles, projected growth, and wages. C4C is a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance, made possible by The Merck Company Foundation, Google, Palo Alto Networks, and Apple.

Gotta Have IT cover

Gotta Have IT is an all-in-one computing resource kit designed with educators' needs in mind. A select set of high-quality posters, computing and careers information, digital media and more, the resource kit builds awareness and inspires interest in computing.

Gotta Have IT is for all students, but is especially inclusive of girls. Read more about these resources here.

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Companies that establish organizational accountability for diversity, whether in the form of full-time diversity staff or a diversity task force, are more likely to increase the representation of women and minorities in management than companies that use only mentoring or diversity training programs. 

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Schools across the country and around the world are working to increase access to quality CS education. But while CS classes and opportunities are expanding, too many students — especially girls, Black, Latino and Native American youth — feel like it’s not for them. As a result, the whole world misses out on the diverse perspectives needed to fuel innovation and drive change. The insights and tools in this kit will help ensure all young people understand the value of a CS education and feel welcomed and empowered to succeed.

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Let’s Talk About Gender, Race, and Identity

Use this slide deck, with its short videos (~3 min) and discussion questions, to learn about the complexity of gender, the concept of intersectionality, and how to have productive discussions about race.

International Women's Day-in-a-Box

International Women's Day-in-a-Box: Raising Awareness, Igniting Change is designed to help IT companies and departments celebrate successes and address barriers to women's full participation in IT, and capitalize on women's innovative thinking and leadership potential. If your organization is eager to promote diversity in order to become globally competitive, then International Women's Day-in-a-Box is for you. Use this resource to plan company activities and events, and to establish a culture and expectation for broader diversity of thought in IT.

Entrepreneurial Series Report #5 summarizes research literature on women's entrepreneurship in the information technology field with a focus on social science research.

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Faculty mentoring programs help junior faculty to acclimate and promote relationships that can cover a broad range of topics. These programs enhance career commitment and self-confidence in women. Successful programs initiate mentor pairings early for new faculty and formally facilitate the relationship until the mentor-protégé bond is established.

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This Talking Point Card explains stereotype threat and how it is triggered, shares examples of effects from stereotype threat, and suggests ways to create a stereotype threat-free environment for attracting able and diverse students to computing.

This report, sponsored by NCWIT, adds to the relatively limited research studying patterns of women-founded, venture-backed startups. While others have tended to look at topline aggregates of venture deals and funding amounts by the gender composition of founding teams, researchers for this report track “first financings” (initial venture investments), examining first financings by founder gender over time, by industry, and across U.S. metropolitan areas. Outcomes for women-founded companies versus non-women-founded firms are also compared.

Evaluating a Mentoring Program Guide
Need help evaluating your mentoring program? This resource provides a step-by-step plan with example metrics for evaluating a workplace mentoring program (in either industry or academia). Recommendations are based on best practices in professional program evaluation. This guide can be used as a companion resource to NCWIT's Mentoring-in-a-Box: Technical Women at Work available at www.ncwit.org/imentor and NCWIT's Mentoring-in-a-Box: Women Faculty in Computing at www.ncwit.org/facultymentor.

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