Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

Preview Image

The NCWIT Engagement Practices Framework outlines actions faculty can take in their classrooms and beyond to help broaden participation in computing. It is organized around three evidence-based principles for engaging and retaining all students: Make It Matter, Grow Inclusive Student Community, and Build Student Confidence and Professional Identity. Within this resource, you will find tips for implementing each practice, some examples, and links to resources to learn more.

Top 10 Ways to Thrive in Your Technical Career

This resource provides tips mid-career technical women can use to advance their careers.

View online.

Preview Image

Three out of five schools in the U.S. do not offer computing courses that include programming or coding, yet we know that computing jobs are the way of the future. This computer science (CS) Guide not only empowers teachers, but also inspires students.

Top 10 Ways Cover Image

Are you interested in getting more girls involved in your computing competition? This Top 10 resource offers simple suggestions to make your competition appeal to a wider range of participants. Taking these steps will benefit all students and help make your event a success. 

View Online

Preview Image

In August 2016, representatives from more than 40 non-profit, industry, media, education, and policy organizations gathered for a Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable, hosted by NCWIT and Google, to discuss influence, intersectionality, and media messaging. Participants reported increased awareness about the importance of encouraging and supporting black women and girls through tangible resources and actions.

This report examines the effects of participation in Globaloria on girls' interests, confidence, and participation in computing activities by analyzing pre- and post- test data for Globaloria participants and enrollment data for Globaloria elective courses. Results demonstrate that outcomes of Globaloria participation among girls include an increase in several home computing activities for girls, and that total female enrollment in elective Globaloria courses is higher than the national average for female enrollment in computing courses.

Preview Image

Achieving equity in the tech industry must be intersectional: race, class, gender, sexuality, and other key factors of identity shape experiences differently; and understanding those differences is critical to promoting diversity, inclusion, and change for women, girls, and other underrepresented groups in IT.

Preview Image

Positive leader-member relationships are characterized by exchanges of trust, respect, and low formality. They measurably improve performance, job satisfaction, and commitment.

View the research

Preview Image

Learn more about using Computation Creativity activities in your introductory computing courses to engage your students and to improve their learning. In this March 2018 issue of ACM Inroads magazine, NCWIT Research Scientist and EngageCSEdu Director Beth Quinn interviews Professors Liz Ingraham and Leen-Kiat Soh. Professors Ingraham and Soh, along with other colleagues from University of Nebraska, are building and testing off-line activities for developing students' creative computational thinking, or "Computational Creativity." Dr.

Preview Image

What should you tell a young person about IT careers? How can they prepare now for a career in IT?

NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award: Recipient

Display the "NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award: Recipient" badge at your site.

Pages