Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

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NCWIT Tips: 9 Tips for Creating Inclusive Corporate Websites

Your company’s website is an important tool for communicating commitment to diversity to clients, the public, and current and prospective employees. These tips will help you create a website that welcomes a wide range of people and promotes the meaningful role of computing within the company.

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Intersectionality in Tech 101

Intersectionality is a critical and necessary concept to develop effective programs to broaden the participation of women and girls in computing. This resource provides a background and overview of the concept, in addition to key readings and resources related to women and girls of color in STEM and computing. 

 

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Military Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Military Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing (C4C), this card connects students' interests with opportunities in IT and computing that can be achieved through military service and beyond. Information about IT military assignments is linked to future jobs and salaries. C4C is a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance, made possible by The Merck Company Foundation, Google, Palo Alto Networks, and Apple.

NCWIT AspireIT: Grant Recipient

NCWIT AspireIT: Grant Recipient (Online Badge)

Display the "NCWIT AspireIT: Grant Recipient" badge at your site.

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Critical Listening Guide: Just Because You Always Hear It, Doesn't Mean It's True

Use this guide to help identify common misunderstandings that surface when people talk about how to increase the participation of women.  Learn to spot "red flags" that indicate a particular discussion is headed in a direction that may not be research-based or effective.

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Computer Science Professional Development Guide

Three out of five schools in the U.S. do not offer computing courses that include programming or coding, yet we know that computing jobs are the way of the future. This computer science (CS) Guide not only empowers teachers, but also inspires students.

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Performance Review/Talent Management

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Performance Review/Talent Management

Supervising-in-a-Box: Performance Review/Talent Management provides supervisors with resources for reducing biases in performance evaluation and talent management systems. This “Box” includes tip sheets, resources for identifying and reducing biases, templates, evaluation tools, key takeaways, and background information on unconscious biases.

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Computing Education and Future Jobs: A Look at National, State & Congressional District Data

This report includes data about IT jobs and computer science education, disaggregated by state and congressional district.

Or, use the interactive map to look at education and jobs in your area.

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Top 10 Ways to Increase Girls' Participation in Computing Competitions

Are you interested in getting more girls involved in your computing competition? This Top 10 resource offers simple suggestions to make your competition appeal to a wider range of participants. Taking these steps will benefit all students and help make your event a success. 

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Male Allies and Advocates:* Helping Create Inclusive & Highly Productive Technology Workplaces

 

Assessing Girls’ Interest, Confidence, and Participation in Computing Activities: Results for Globaloria in West Virginia

This report examines the effects of participation in Globaloria on girls' interests, confidence, and participation in computing activities by analyzing pre- and post- test data for Globaloria participants and enrollment data for Globaloria elective courses. Results demonstrate that outcomes of Globaloria participation among girls include an increase in several home computing activities for girls, and that total female enrollment in elective Globaloria courses is higher than the national average for female enrollment in computing courses.

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Colorism Bias in the Tech Industry

Achieving equity in the tech industry must be intersectional: race, class, gender, sexuality, and other key factors of identity shape experiences differently; and understanding those differences is critical to promoting diversity, inclusion, and change for women, girls, and other underrepresented groups in IT.

Information Technology: How the power of IT and the power of women will power the future

Information Technology: How the power of IT and the power of women will power the future

A report on the importance of IT to our future, and why women's participation matters.

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