Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Supervisors as Change Agents
Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Supervisors as Change Agents is for supervisors who wish to become change agents in their organizations. The materials are focused on actions that you as an individual supervisor can take to raise awareness and motivate change. Of course, supervisors cannot “do it all,” but these individual efforts are often what it takes to spark change. The materials here also point to other NCWIT resources that can help with planning more systemic, department, or company-wide change at later stages.
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Use these tips to identify likely male advocates. Also use this resource to spark discussion or role-play how you might put these tips into action in your own organization. These ideas and quotes are taken from research NCWIT conducted with males in technical workplaces.

View online.

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Sexism has measurably harmful effects, but sexist behavior can be minimized. Instructors and supervisors can practice zero tolerance and facilitate positive peer interactions, and they can provide highly visible leadership, policies, and procedures that go beyond legalities to explicitly denounce sexism.

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Careers with Code magazine is a guide for 14–18 year olds and anyone else interested in future careers that mix computer science with their skills, interests and passion – giving you the ability to change the world! It’s free to read online, available to order in print and updated each year.
 

Knowledge of computer science (CS) is fundamental to students’ future careers. This guide provides educators with context and concrete steps to build and expand inclusivity in CS education. By actively engaging students in CS, educators can build an even stronger pipeline of creativity and innovation to tackle the world’s challenges and help ensure students have the skills needed to thrive today and tomorrow.

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The original 2007 report, Who Invents IT? An Analysis of Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, examined the rates at which women have been patenting in information technology (IT), how these rates have evolved between 1980-2005, and how these rates differ across IT industry sub-categories and across specific organizations. This edition updates the previous report, exploring these trends from 2006-2010.

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Encouragement increases self-efficacy, which is the belief in one’s ability to successfully perform a task. Because we are more likely to engage in tasks that we believe we can perform successfully, encouragement may be especially useful for attracting women to male-stereotyped fields such as computing.

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The recent upsurge in enrollments in computing means that student attrition has a substantial opportunity cost. Admitting a student who leaves both reduces graduation yield and prevents another equally qualified student from enrolling. Professors cannot change the background of students, but they can control many aspects of student experience in the computing major. This paper presents the results of a study to understand strongest predictors of retention in undergraduate computing based on a large-scale survey administered in 14 U.S.

This editor-reviewed article in the Journal for Computing Teachers, Summer 2011 Edition, provides a detailed overview of the many free, easy-to-use publications available online for educators interested in attracting more students to computing.

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Women in Computing (WIC) groups on college and university campuses can help reduce feelings of isolation and increase a sense of community and belonging. They can also be places where members can discuss difficulties they encounter and strategies for addressing these challenges in the larger community. But sometimes, women’s groups can also produce unintended consequences (e.g. convey the idea that women are a homogenous group or need "extra help"). Use the following tips to avoid these pitfalls and to ensure the success of your WIC group.

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Inspired by teachers creating Bitmoji virtual classrooms, NCWIT has assembled a set of interactive elements to help teachers make all students feel welcome and to maintain and enhance their interest in computing. By adding the elements to their own virtual classrooms, teachers can maintain a positive classroom climate, show students “possible selves” in computing, maintain student interest, and show them career and other opportunities (including NCWIT opportunities, of course).

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Institutional barriers (IBs) are policies, procedures, or situations that systematically disadvantage certain groups of people. IBs exist in any majority-minority group situation. When an initial population is fairly similar (e.g., in male-dominated professions), systems naturally emerge to meet the needs of this population. If these systems do not change with the times, they can inhibit the success of new members with different needs. IBs often seem natural or “just the way things are around here.”
University Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing (C4C), this card connects students' interests with IT and computing career paths that can be achieved through enrollment in a university or four-year college. Degree programs are linked to job titles, projected growth, and wages. C4C is a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance, made possible by The Merck Company Foundation, Google, Palo Alto Networks, and Apple.

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