Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

Top 10 Ways Successful Technical Women Increase Their Visibility

Increasing your visibility is important for advancing your career. This list includes ten things that highly successful women say they do in order to increase their visibility throughout the company, industry, and technical community.

View online.

Set of ten TECHNOLOchicas 11"x17" posters.

Messaging Toolkit

NCWIT has developed a new messaging platform that emphasizes the creative potential for organizations that invest in fostering a culture where girls, women, and underrepresented groups participate with strong voices. The headline, “The idea you don’t have is the voice you haven’t heard,” and the tagline, “Inclusion changes what’s possible,” are confident expressions of what we know is true: Diversity and inclusion enhance outcomes in technological innovation for educational institutions and businesses of all sizes. 

Information Technology: How the power of IT and the power of women will power the future
A report on the importance of IT to our future, and why women's participation matters.
Gotta Have IT cover

Gotta Have IT is an all-in-one computing resource kit designed with educators' needs in mind. A select set of high-quality posters, computing and careers information, digital media and more, the resource kit builds awareness and inspires interest in computing.

Gotta Have IT is for all students, but is especially inclusive of girls. Read more about these resources here.

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Diverse work teams can improve innovation, problem-solving, and productivity.

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This customizable PowerPoint presentation is an excellent resource for schools who wish to educate their community about computer science, to teach about the importance of diversity in CS education and to offer concrete strategies for making curricula and classrooms more inclusive to help close the gender gap in STEM and CS.

Download the PowerPoint slides below.

Computing Science Is for Everyone | .pptx (8.7 MB)

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Why do some women persist in computing and others don’t?

The NCWIT "Learning from Young Women" study was a longitudinal mixed methods research project that explored this question. This longitudinal study included a large sample of women from around the United States who spanned the pipeline from high school through college through workforce over a period of six years. 
 

Talking Points
In the popular press and in public debate, one often hears that U.S. students are performing poorly in math and science in comparison to other countries. What is the basis for these claims? What are students’ actual scores and rankings? How should we interpret and use these scores? A better understanding of the evidence is important for making effective policy decisions that affect computer science and other STEM fields.
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Paired mentors and protégés exchange advice for career advancement and reduced turnover. Formal mentoring programs may include organized activities that provide a framework for the mentor-protégé relationship and can lead to more rapid career advancement and higher career satisfaction for participants than non-participants.

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The first step toward an effective flexible workplace is for managers to create an environment where employees feel they can discuss available work-life options without being stigmatized. These tips can help managers create such an environment, followed by additional tips for actually having these conversations with employees.

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This Guide was created to support the use of evidence-based interventions by change leaders. It can help researchers to avoid jargon and communicate effectively. This resource is intended to help readers design an overall communication strategy. Steps include identifying goals and philosophy, deciding whether to translate at all, carefully analyzing specific audiences, and based on these, developing a user-centered communication strategy.

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