Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

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One of NCWIT’s most popular reports has been updated for 2016. See what’s changed and what hasn’t. Women in Tech: The Facts brings together the latest findings from recent research on technical women including the current state of affairs for technical women, a summary of the key barriers to women's participation in technology, promising practices for addressing these barriers, and tools to support your organization's change efforts.

Girls in IT: The Facts (report)

Girls in IT: The Facts, sponsored by NCWIT's K-12 Alliance, is a synthesis of the existing literature on increasing girls’ participation in computing. It aims to bring together this latest research so that readers can gain a clearer and more coherent picture of 1) the current state of affairs for girls in computing, 2) the key barriers to increasing girls’ participation in these fields, and 3) promising practices for addressing these barriers.

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Tech's diversity problem is not new information, especially to those of us who work in the industry. There is a trend taking hold in tech companies over the past few years: publishing diversity stats. While taking a hard look in the mirror is an important step in addressing diversity issues, taking additional steps to implement meaningful change efforts is also important. But what steps are most effective?

Top 10 Ways Managers Can Increase the Visibility of Technical Women

This resource highlights ten important recommendations supervisors or managers can readily adopt to improve visibility of their employees. These recommendations are particularly useful for improving the visibility of women, as well as employees from other underrepresented groups.

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Effective feedback gives employees information they can realistically use to increase their learning and improve their performance. It abandons a "fixed mindset" that sees skills as "innate abilities" and instead employs a "growth mindset" that sees skills as developed through continued effort and practice.

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Culturally Responsive Computing (CRC) programs help educators connect computing curriculum to the interests, prior experiences, and needs of students diverse in race, class, ability, and sexual orientation. One such promising program is COMPUGIRLS.

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How can I prepare for a computing major?
Produced with the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA), this card gives computing-specific advice for the steps to take on the path from high school to college.
NCWIT2GO

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Top 10 Ways

This resource features ten ways male advocates say they support technical women and promote diversity efforts in their organizations. Use the ideas to influence your own efforts.

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Once you have identified potential advocates, use these tips to increase their advocacy. These ideas and quotes are drawn from research NCWIT conducted with male advocates in technical workplaces. Tips range from ways of raising awareness to technologies for encouraging activism.

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Check out the most compelling statistics on women's participation in computing on a single page.

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Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students.

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EngageCSEdu

EngageCSEdu offers hundreds of materials for introductory computing courses, including projects, homework assignments, and labs. The materials are peer reviewed and searchable by topic, programming language, and more.

Moving Beyond Computer Literacy: Why schools should teach computer science
Computer Science (CS) — not computer literacy — underlies most innovation today, from biotechnology to geoscience to national security. Computer science teaches students design, logical reasoning, and problem solving — all valuable well beyond the computer science classroom. This resource provides information about the value of computer science curriculum for students, educators, local and national economies as well as global society. It offers steps schools can take to successfully incorporate computer science education.
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Developing a diverse workforce must be treated like any other critical business issue. Use this guide to help you collect important data and develop a strategic plan for increasing the meaningful participation of diverse groups in your organization.

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