Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

The February 2011 National Girls Collaborative Project Webinar, NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology, is archived at the NGCP website. This webcast highlights free materials and information for attracting more girls and underrepresented groups to computing and information technology and shares how formal and informal educators are using these resources to strengthen programming for girls. An archive of the webinar and the final powerpoint slides are available for viewing:

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NCWIT AspireIT is designed to teach K-12 girls programming fundamentals and computational thinking in fun, creative, and hands-on environments. AspireIT participants are ultimately encouraged to contribute their unique perspectives and ideas to future innovations. This attention-getting infographic summarizes who can get involved and the support that they will receive from NCWIT.

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Gearing Up for Change

Change agents must understand and consider their organization’s complex and interlocking systems. Plans for change must ensure that subsystems work in harmony with each other to reinforce the envisioned change. This resource outlines the prerequisites to transforming for diversity in undergraduate computing and explains NCWIT’s Extension Services for Undergraduate Programs (ES-UP).

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The décor of physical spaces conveys messages about the kinds of people who belong there and the kinds of activities that should be done there. Understanding this influence allows us to actively craft an environment that makes a broad range of people feel welcome in computing.

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Ensuring that your technical conference provides a welcome environment for a wide range of attendees is important for broadening participation in technology. Use these tips to help you create a more inclusive and welcoming conference experience for all.

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This self-guided course is designed for computing and information technology faculty and administrators who are beginning work on diversifying undergraduate computing programs or are trying to reignite existing initiatives. 

Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women Guide

Managers and others can use this guide to find NCWIT resources that will help them create highly-productive, diverse technical teams. Resources are catalogued by the key “change areas” identified in the NCWIT Change Model for Industry: 1) Top Leadership Support, 2) Supervisory Relationships, 3) Recruitment and Selection, 4) Talent Development and Mentoring, 5) Performance Evaluation and Promotion, 6) Support for Competing Responsibilities, 7) Reduction of Subtle Biases, and 8) Ongoing Evaluation.  Space also exists for adding company-specific resources into the guide.

Entrepreneurial Series Report #1 summarizes research literature on women's entrepreneurship in the information technology field with a focus on gender differences in firm size, growth, and persistence.

In this video, Lecia Barker (National Center for Women in Information Technology) discusses research on best practices for outreach to young women and minority students. Lecia looks at the research evidence underlying the choices you need to make when doing a roadshow presentation, specifically why you choose the messages and the activities that you choose. http://csta.acm.org/Videos/whatresearchtellsus.mov

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Significant evidence suggests that diverse work teams produce tangible benefits, including improved innovation, problem-solving, and productivity.

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How Can You Re-Engineer Your Undergraduate Program to Increase Women's Representation in Computing? Small Steps Toward Systemic Change (Case Study 1)

The socio-educational system a student experiences shapes participation in the major. Altering one element of that system is often not enough to create enduring change. When faculty members are ready to implement organizational innovation, success is more likely if they receive support from institutional leaders, have access to adequate resources, and are able to participate in decision-making about the change.

Girls in IT: The Facts (infographic)

This attention-getting infographic summarizes the key findings from the Girls in IT report. Use this piece to raise awareness about ways to increase girls' participation in computing.

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A standard business card with contact info and QR code on the front, and a blank back for writing.

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