Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

PPT Cover

Use these PowerPoint slides in combination with the Counselor Lesson Plan (PDF) to introduce middle and high school students to computing and careers.

Download slides

Preview Image

Collaborative learning can improve retention rates, critical thinking, appreciation of diversity, and development of social and professional skills. When implementing collaborative learning, match students roughly according to experience levels and make sure to give students opportunities to work together for both graded and un-graded assignments.

View the research

Preview Image

Use this resource to help you practice ways to interrupt bias in real-life situations.

Preview Image

Students see just ten of the many ways computer science is making the world a better place. Encourage them to imagine more.

This poster is one of three Counselors for Computing (C4C) posters, developed in collaboration with CareerswithCode.com and produced by Refraction Media: ncwit.org/CwCposters.

Preview Image

This workbook will help educators and influencers understand the research-based reasons why a diverse range of girls are less likely to take computing courses in high school. High school teachers are provided with actionable recommendations for creating recruiting and outreach interventions that work.

 

This large printable poster (24"x36") provides information about various paths students can take to get to a career in computing. The poster includes specific steps to follow beginning in high school, college, university and military service pathways that lead to various jobs.

Preview Image

Making curricula more relevant to students, introducing collaborative learning into the classroom, and tailoring courses to different student experience levels benefit female as well as male students. 

View the research

Preview Image

Whether or not an organization will fully benefit from diversity depends on how its members answer the questions, “What do we do with this diversity? Why do we want a diversified workforce?” Organizations must explicitly address these questions if they are to prevent diversity efforts from backfiring and if they are to reap the oft-touted benefits of better performance and productivity. Three organizational diversity paradigms are presented along with the assumptions and practices, pros, and cons of each.

Preview Image

This is the second of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing. This article focuses on 2016 Engagement Excellence awardees Elizabeth Boese from the University of Colorado at Boulder and Mark LeBlanc from Wheaton College (Massachusetts). They were recognized for introductory CS course materials that made use of exceptionally creative interdisciplinary connections to computing.

Preview Image

Student influencers such as formal and informal educators and parents are eager to direct students to viable education opportunities in computing. Consider these key points and resources that can be used to integrate computing skills into existing curricula, encourage diverse participation in computing, and/or connect students to informal learning environments that emphasize hands-on experience with technology.

Preview Image

In honor of Black History Month (February 2020) and Women’s History Month (March 2020), NCWIT celebrates the contributions of black women and girls in computing by hosting a three-part virtual chat: “The Color of Our Future: An Online Conversation Series on the Empowerment and Inclusion of Black Women & Girls in Tech.” The series explores black girls in K-12, black women in postsecondary computing education, and black women in the tech workforce.

Mentoring-in-a-Box: Technical Women at Work

Technical women face challenges, from institutionalized bias to differences in communication styles to a lack of female role models. Developed in collaboration with AnitaB.org, Mentoring-in-a-Box: Technical Women at Work helps women excel in the technical professions and advance to positions of leadership.

 

Preview Image

Sponsors can make a world of difference in anyone's career, but research shows that they can be especially important for female or other employees who are a minority in a majority-group environment. Use these tips to identify protégés and to be an effective sponsor.

View Online

Pages