Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

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Sexism has measurably harmful effects, but sexist behavior can be minimized. Instructors and supervisors can practice zero tolerance and facilitate positive peer interactions, and they can provide highly visible leadership, policies, and procedures that go beyond legalities to explicitly denounce sexism.

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Careers with Code magazine is a guide for middle and high school students, and anyone else interested in future careers that mix computer science with their skills, interests, and passion – giving you the ability to change the world! It's free to read online or download.

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How can library staff attract girls to their coding and maker programs? This webinar by NCWIT Senior Research Scientist Lecia Barker and Homer, Alaska Youth Services Librarian Claudia Haines describes reasons girls may shy away from these programs and gives some practical advice for identifying target audiences and their influencers, messaging that addresses four important factors that affect involvement, and ways of making programs visible. 

Information Technology: How the power of IT and the power of women will power the future
A report on the importance of IT to our future, and why women's participation matters.
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Gotta Have IT is an all-in-one computing resource kit designed with educators' needs in mind. A select set of high-quality posters, computing and careers information, digital media and more, the resource kit builds awareness and inspires interest in computing.

Gotta Have IT is for all students, but is especially inclusive of girls. Read more about these resources here.

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Encouragement increases self-efficacy, which is the belief in one’s ability to successfully perform a task. Because we are more likely to engage in tasks that we believe we can perform successfully, encouragement may be especially useful for attracting women to male-stereotyped fields such as computing.

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The recent upsurge in enrollments in computing means that student attrition has a substantial opportunity cost. Admitting a student who leaves both reduces graduation yield and prevents another equally qualified student from enrolling. Professors cannot change the background of students, but they can control many aspects of student experience in the computing major. This paper presents the results of a study to understand strongest predictors of retention in undergraduate computing based on a large-scale survey administered in 14 U.S.

This editor-reviewed article in the Journal for Computing Teachers, Summer 2011 Edition, provides a detailed overview of the many free, easy-to-use publications available online for educators interested in attracting more students to computing.

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Women in Computing (WIC) groups on college and university campuses can help reduce feelings of isolation and increase a sense of community and belonging. They can also be places where members can discuss difficulties they encounter and strategies for addressing these challenges in the larger community. But sometimes, women’s groups can also produce unintended consequences (e.g. convey the idea that women are a homogenous group or need "extra help"). Use the following tips to avoid these pitfalls and to ensure the success of your WIC group.

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The NCWIT Engagement Practices Framework is a set of three evidence-based principles for engaging and retaining ALL students: Make It Matter, Grow Inclusive Student Community, and Build Student Confidence and Professional Identity. This poster outlines actionable things faculty can do in their classrooms and beyond to help broaden participation in computing. Display it your office or in the faculty mailroom to remind you and your colleagues of effective ways to engage all of your students.

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In the popular press and in public debate, one often hears that U.S. students are performing poorly in math and science in comparison to other countries. What is the basis for these claims? What are students’ actual scores and rankings? How should we interpret and use these scores? A better understanding of the evidence is important for making effective policy decisions that affect computer science and other STEM fields.
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In addition to demonstrating expertise and experience, intentional role models display their strengths and weaknesses and help observers see how they could attain a similar position. Role modeling is less interactive than mentoring, but is often a component of mentoring relationships.

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These tips can help employees have effective conversations about flexible work options with their managers.

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