Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

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These tips will help you to engage students in your computing courses and retain them in the major. These ideas and examples are drawn from theory and research conducted by social scientists who study issues related to diversity and retention in computing. Methods range from encouraging words to inclusive classroom environments.

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Learn about some of the hidden barriers that often prevent technical organizations from hiring and retaining top talent. This video will take you through a series of engaging, interactive experiments that introduce the concept of unconscious bias and explain why this information is vital for technical companies to understand. The video will also point to free NCWIT resources you can use to address these hidden barriers in order to better attract and retain a diverse workforce that will drive future innovation.

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Employee Recruitment/Selection
Supervising-in-a-Box: Employee Recruitment/Selection provides supervisors with resources for recruiting and hiring the best talent. This “Box” includes background information, a training guide, tip sheets, resources for employee recruitment and selection, templates, evaluation tools, and a summary of key takeaways.
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Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students.

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Developing a diverse workforce must be treated like any other critical business issue. Use this guide to help you collect important data and develop a strategic plan for increasing the meaningful participation of diverse groups in your organization.

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Tech's diversity problem is not new information, especially to those of us who work in the industry. There is a trend taking hold in tech companies over the past few years: publishing diversity stats. While taking a hard look in the mirror is an important step in addressing diversity issues, taking additional steps to implement meaningful change efforts is also important. But what steps are most effective?

NCWIT Checklist for Reducing Unconscious Bias in Job Descriptions/Advertisements

This Job Description Checklist helps you analyze ads for subtle biases in language, in criteria, and in how you describe your workplace.

View NCWIT Tips for Writing Better Job Ads.

 

 

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In the popular press and in public debate, one often hears that U.S. students are performing poorly in math and science in comparison to other countries. What is the basis for these claims? What are students’ actual scores and rankings? How should we interpret and use these scores? A better understanding of the evidence is important for making effective policy decisions that affect computer science and other STEM fields.
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Task assignment is a key area where bias emerges, exacerbating workplace inequity. Research shows that women and members of other underrepresented groups are more often channeled into “execution” or project management roles and are less likely to receive high-value, high-visibility, or stretch assignments (Hewlett et al., 2008; 2014). 
 
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This is the first of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing. This article focuses on informal ways of encouraging student interaction as a means to building positive, inclusive student community. It also includes information on how faculty can contribute to the collection and serve as reviewers.

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Institutional barriers (IBs) are policies, procedures, or situations that systematically disadvantage certain groups of people. IBs exist in any majority-minority group situation. When an initial population is fairly similar (e.g., in male-dominated professions), systems naturally emerge to meet the needs of this population. If these systems do not change with the times, they can inhibit the success of new members with different needs. IBs often seem natural or “just the way things are around here.”
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Achieving equity in the tech industry must be intersectional: race, class, gender, sexuality, and other key factors of identity shape experiences differently; and understanding those differences is critical to promoting diversity, inclusion, and change for women, girls, and other underrepresented groups in IT.

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Use this resource to help you practice ways to interrupt bias in real-life situations.

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The design and décor of the physical spaces where people work contain signals about who does and who does not belong there. When we view these spaces through a diversity of perspectives, we can reveal features that signal exclusion to many people in subtle or overt ways — as well as opportunities where we can intentionally signal inclusion for a broad range of people.

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Research shows that even individuals committed to equality harbor unconscious biases that impact everyday decisions and interactions. In the IT workplace, unconscious gender bias can mislead employers, both male and female, to make inaccurate judgments in hiring, performance reviews, and promotion.

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