Resources

CACM Cover Image

Bringing Young Women into Computing Through the NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Program

Article in CACM describing the obstacles girls face in entering computing and how the Aspirations program seeks to overcome those. Great overview of issues, the Aspirations program and ways individuals can get involved with the program.

Preview Image

Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable: Executive Brief

In August 2016, representatives from more than 40 non-profit, industry, media, education, and policy organizations gathered for a Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable, hosted by NCWIT and Google, to discuss influence, intersectionality, and media messaging. Participants reported increased awareness about the importance of encouraging and supporting black women and girls through tangible resources and actions.

Positive Illusions, Motivations, Management Style, Stereotypes, Stress, and Psychological Traits: A Review of Research Literature on Women's Entrepreneurship in the Information Technology Field

Entrepreneurial Series Report #2 summarizes research literature on women's entrepreneurship in the information technology field with a focus on positive illusions, motivations, management style, stereotypes, stress, and psychological traits.

Preview Image

How Can Organizations Recruit Diverse Talent in Ways that Promote Innovation and Productivity?

Significant evidence suggests that diverse work teams produce tangible benefits, including improved innovation, problem-solving, and productivity.

View the research

Strategic Planning for Increasing Women’s Participation in the Computing Industry

Strategic Planning for Increasing Women’s Participation in the Computing Industry

This workbook presents guidelines for strategic planning to reach gender parity in technology companies or departments. Key components include: A Blueprint for Sustained Increases in Women’s Participation; Create Your Strategic Plan Using the NCWIT IT Industry Reform Model; Lay the Foundation with Top Leadership Support, Institutional Accountability, and Supervisory Relationships; Build the Ecosystem; Evaluation.

Who Invents IT Thumbnail

Who Invents IT? Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, 2012 Update

The original 2007 report, Who Invents IT? An Analysis of Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, examined the rates at which women have been patenting in information technology (IT), how these rates have evolved between 1980-2005, and how these rates differ across IT industry sub-categories and across specific organizations. This edition updates the previous report, exploring these trends from 2006-2010.

Preview Image

How Can Organizations Reap the Benefits of a Diverse Workforce?

Whether or not an organization will fully benefit from diversity depends on how its members answer the questions, “What do we do with this diversity? Why do we want a diversified workforce?” Organizations must explicitly address these questions if they are to prevent diversity efforts from backfiring and if they are to reap the oft-touted benefits of better performance and productivity. Three organizational diversity paradigms are presented along with the assumptions and practices, pros, and cons of each.

Communicating for Change: Persuade Colleagues to Get on Board

Communicating for Change: Persuade Colleagues to Get on Board

Changing the culture of an organization to one that promotes women’s participation in computing requires that members reach new understandings and act in new ways. Enlisting allies in this process requires persuasive communication. This resource provides guidance on the four distinct and necessary steps for the long-term process of effective persuasion.

For more information on the Extension Services program, visit ncwit.org/extensionservices.

Preview Image

Collaborating to Grow the Pathway of Native Americans in STEM: White Paper

Intel, in partnership with NCWIT, hosted Growing the Legacy of Native American Leadership in Science and Technology: A Thought Leadership Event. Key leaders in academia, government, tribal nations, non-profit organizations, and the tech industry convened to discuss the state of technology in Native American communities, identify gaps, and create actionable steps for increasing Native American student participation and retention in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education.

The State of Social Science Research on Gender and IT Entrepreneurship: A Summary of Research Literature on Women’s Entrepreneurship in the Information Technology Field

Entrepreneurial Series Report #5 summarizes research literature on women's entrepreneurship in the information technology field with a focus on social science research.

Preview Image

How Can Reducing Unconscious Bias Increase Women’s Success in IT?

Research shows that even individuals committed to equality harbor unconscious biases that impact everyday decisions and interactions. In the IT workplace, unconscious gender bias can mislead employers, both male and female, to make inaccurate judgments in hiring, performance reviews, and promotion.

View the research

Which gender differences matter for high-tech entrepreneurship? (Published in Open Source Business Resource, July 2011)

This article was published in Open Source Business Resource.  With data from successful founders of high-tech companies, we identify traits common to large majorities of them and any gender differences in those traits. There are few.

NCWIT Scorecard

NCWIT Scorecard: A Report on the Status of Women in Information Technology

The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.

Preview Image

Interrupting Bias in Academic Settings

Use this resource to help you practice ways to interrupt bias in real-life situations.

Use the orange button to download a printable copy of this resource and facilitation guide.

Gender and Computing Conference Papers

More than 40 years of data on authors of ACM conference papers describe women’s contribution to this important aspect of computing professional life. The data show that women’s authorship increased substantially over time, and that relative to their representation in the likely pool of ACM conference paper authors, women Ph.D.s were especially productive. Initial tests indicate that the increase in women’s share of papers was due in large part to the increase in number of women in the community of potential authors.

Pages