Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

 

Summaries of Selected Research of SSAB Members and Visitors to 2012 NCWIT Summit

Members of the Social Science Advisory Board (SSAB) support the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) through their research and knowledge about women and information technology.  The depth and breadth of perspectives and approaches that SSAB members and visitors bring to the study of women and computing are illustrated in examples of their recent research projects.  In the research summaries that follow, we see expertise across social science fields, and theoretical and empirical issues and findings with implications for diversity and the full participation of wome

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Who Invents IT? Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, 2012 Update

The original 2007 report, Who Invents IT? An Analysis of Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, examined the rates at which women have been patenting in information technology (IT), how these rates have evolved between 1980-2005, and how these rates differ across IT industry sub-categories and across specific organizations. This edition updates the previous report, exploring these trends from 2006-2010.

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Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Full Series

Employees report that the supervisory relationship is one of the most significant factors in their decision to leave or stay with an organization. Are you, as a supervisor, adequately prepared for this responsibility?

Even if your institution already has a formal training program for supervisors, use Supervising-in-a-Box to create highly productive teams that reduce employee turnover, capitalize on diverse innovative thinking, and ultimately strengthen their bottom lines.

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Top 10 Ways to Be a Male Advocate for Technical Women

This resource features ten ways male advocates say they support technical women and promote diversity efforts in their organizations. Use the ideas to influence your own efforts.

View online.

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Computing Education and Future Jobs: A Look at National, State & Congressional District Data

This report includes data about IT jobs and computer science education, disaggregated by state and congressional district.

Or, use the interactive map to look at education and jobs in your area.

Top 10 Ways Managers Can Retain Technical Women

Top 10 Ways Managers Can Retain Technical Women

This resource includes ten important recommendations supervisors can readily adopt to improve retention for all employees. They are particularly useful for retaining women and employees from underrepresented groups.

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Top 10 Ways Managers Can Increase the Visibility of Technical Women

Top 10 Ways Managers Can Increase the Visibility of Technical Women

This resource highlights ten important recommendations supervisors or managers can readily adopt to improve visibility of their employees. These recommendations are particularly useful for improving the visibility of women, as well as employees from other underrepresented groups.

View online.

Top 10 Ways Successful Technical Women Increase Their Visibility

Top 10 Ways Successful Technical Women Increase Their Visibility

Increasing your visibility is important for advancing your career. This list includes ten things that highly successful women say they do in order to increase their visibility throughout the company, industry, and technical community.

View online.

Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women Guide

Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women Guide

Managers and others can use this guide to find NCWIT resources that will help them create highly-productive, diverse technical teams. Resources are catalogued by the key “change areas” identified in the NCWIT Change Model for Industry: 1) Top Leadership Support, 2) Supervisory Relationships, 3) Recruitment and Selection, 4) Talent Development and Mentoring, 5) Performance Evaluation and Promotion, 6) Support for Competing Responsibilities, 7) Reduction of Subtle Biases, and 8) Ongoing Evaluation.  Space also exists for adding company-specific resources into the guide.

Gender and Computing Conference Papers

More than 40 years of data on authors of ACM conference papers describe women’s contribution to this important aspect of computing professional life. The data show that women’s authorship increased substantially over time, and that relative to their representation in the likely pool of ACM conference paper authors, women Ph.D.s were especially productive. Initial tests indicate that the increase in women’s share of papers was due in large part to the increase in number of women in the community of potential authors.

 

Which gender differences matter for high-tech entrepreneurship? (Published in Open Source Business Resource, July 2011)

This article was published in Open Source Business Resource. With data from successful founders of high-tech companies, we identify traits common to large majorities of them and any gender differences in those traits. There are few. Further, we identify criteria that might lead to gender imbalance among successful founders by comparing similarities and differences in the gender distribution of these traits among the general population and among successful founders.

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Summary of Recent Research on Gender and High-tech Start-ups

High-tech startups typically use one of five types of employment models, reflecting their founders’ ideas about hiring and managing employees. These models can have long-lasting effects on firms and predict the trajectory of women’s representation among core technical staff. This research paper looks at the five models, identifies which are most congenial to hiring women, and points out correlations between competitive business models and meritocratic hiring. 

Evaluating a Mentoring Program Guide

Evaluating a Mentoring Program Guide

Need help evaluating your mentoring program? This resource provides a step-by-step plan with example metrics for evaluating a workplace mentoring program (in either industry or academia). Recommendations are based on best practices in professional program evaluation. This guide can be used as a companion resource to NCWIT's Mentoring-in-a-Box: Technical Women at Work available at www.ncwit.org/imentor and NCWIT's Mentoring-in-a-Box: Women Faculty in Computing at www.ncwit.org/facultymentor.

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How Does the Physical Environment Affect Women’s Entry and Persistence in Computing?

The décor of physical spaces conveys messages about the kinds of people who belong there and the kinds of activities that should be done there. Understanding this influence allows us to actively craft an environment that makes a broad range of people feel welcome in computing.

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