Resources

Preview Image

Evaluation Tools

Find a variety of surveys, observation forms, self-evaluation worksheets, and more that you can use “as is” or adapt for your own evaluation purposes. There are instruments that can be used to help you evaluate K-12, workplace, and post-secondary interventions.

View Online

NCWIT Scorecard

NCWIT Scorecard: A Report on the Status of Women in Information Technology

The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.

Summaries of Selected Research of SSAB Members and Visitors to 2012 NCWIT Summit

Members of the Social Science Advisory Board (SSAB) support the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) through their research and knowledge about women and information technology.  The depth and breadth of perspectives and approaches that SSAB members and visitors bring to the study of women and computing are illustrated in examples of their recent research projects.  In the research summaries that follow, we see expertise across social science fields, and theoretical and empirical issues and findings with implications for diversity and the full participation of wome

NCWIT Resources for Community Colleges

The NCWIT Academic Alliance Community College Outreach Team has selected the resources below as particularly relevant to the community college context.

University Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

University Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing, this card connect students' interests with IT and computing career paths that can be achieved through enrollment in a university or four-year college. Degree programs are linked to job titles, projected growth, and wages. Counselors for Computing (C4C) is a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance, made possible by the Merck Company Foundation.

Preview Image

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way?

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects.

View the research

Community College Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Community College Pathway to IT and Computing Careers

Part of Counselors for Computing, this card connect students' interests with IT and computing career paths that can be achieved through enrollment in a community college. Degrees are linked to job titles, projected growth, and wages. Counselors for Computing (C4C) is a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance, made possible by the Merck Company Foundation.

Preview Image

Efforts to Make Computer Science More Inclusive of Women

This article in a special issue of ACM Inroads magazine describes recent initiatives by NCWIT, ACM-W, and Anita Borg Institute to broaden participation in computing.

Preview Image

NCWIT Tips: 8 Ways to Give Students More Effective Feedback Using a Growth Mindset

Effective feedback gives students information they actually use to increase their learning and improve their performance. It should employ a "growth mindset" that focuses on developing intelligence through effort, practice, and "wise feedback" that spurs additional effort.

View online.

Preview Image

How Do You Retain Women through Collaborative Learning?

Collaborative learning can improve retention rates, critical thinking, appreciation of diversity, and development of social and professional skills. When implementing collaborative learning, match students roughly according to experience levels and make sure to give students opportunities to work together for both graded and un-graded assignments.

View the research

Talking Points

Institutional Barriers & Their Effects: How can I talk to colleagues about these issues?

Institutional barriers (IBs) are policies, procedures, or situations that systematically disadvantage certain groups of people. IBs exist in any majority-minority group situation. When an initial population is fairly similar (e.g., in male-dominated professions), systems naturally emerge to meet the needs of this population. If these systems do not change with the times, they can inhibit the success of new members with different needs. IBs often seem natural or “just the way things are around here.”

Cover Image

Diversity in Computing: Why It Matters and How Organizations Can Achieve It

Computing-related jobs are interesting, well-paying, secure, and abundant, so why aren't more women working in this creative field that produces the technology that is central to our daily lives?

Pages