Resources

By the Numbers

By the Numbers

NCWIT's Women in IT: By the Numbers presents the most compelling statistics on women's participation in IT on a single page.

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Resources for Change Agents

This guide, created by the Extension Services program, helps you find resources for attracting undergraduate women into computing and retaining them through graduation, including tools for assessing your efforts. For more information on the Extension Services program, visit https://www.ncwit.org/project/extension-services-undergraduate-programs.

REU-in-a-Box

REU-In-A-Box: Expanding the Pool of Computing Researchers

REU-in-A-Box: Expanding the Pool of Computing Researchers explains the benefits of undergraduate research in computing with content developed by experienced computing faculty mentors and undergraduate researchers. This resource focuses on the interactions of a faculty mentor with one or a few students and the processes by which they conduct and share the outcomes of their research. 

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How to Create and Sustain a Women in Computing Group on Your Campus

Women's groups can help to retain students and can provide an infrastructure for local activism. This brief guide discusses how to get a group started and to build its structure, the importance of maintaining an open and public presence, possible activities, ways to build membership, and the value of affiliating with other groups.

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How Can REUs Help Retain Female Undergraduates?

Undergraduates with positive research experiences feel more confident and motivated to enter graduate programs. To facilitate successful REUs, supportive faculty advisors or graduate mentors should clearly communicate goals to students and allow them to spend a large amount of time on research, increasing independence as the project progresses.

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¿Por qué las jóvenes deberían considerar una carrera en tecnología de la información?

Spanish version of Why Should Young Women Consider a Career in Information Technology? This card gives adults talking points and additional resources for a conversation with their daughters and/or other young people. The main message is that IT offers meaningful work, security and high salaries with a bachelor’s degree, and flexibility and variety. Information is provided to address these specific questions: What should you tell a young woman about a career in IT? How can a young woman prepare now for a career in IT?

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How Does Combating Overt Sexism Affect Women's Retention?

Sexism has measurably harmful effects, but sexist behavior can be minimized. Instructors and supervisors can practice zero tolerance and facilitate positive peer interactions, and they can provide highly visible leadership, policies, and procedures that go beyond legalities to explicitly denounce sexism.

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A practical model for achieving gender parity in undergraduate computing: Change the system, not the student.

This paper presents a systemic change model of undergraduate computing for accomplishing gender parity. Rather than view women as needing to be modified or repaired to fit the system, this model advocates changing the system to fit the needs of a wider range of students. Changing the system is a more sustainable approach to creating gender parity than providing extra support to students with less experience or background or students who are less likely to feel that people like themselves belong in computing.

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How Do Stereotype Threats Affect Retention?

Stereotype threat harms both performance and motivation by reducing our feelings of competence, belonging, and trust in our colleagues. However, careful thought, education, and regular assessment of diversity practices can help minimize incidents of stereotype threat.

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Why Should Young People Consider Careers in Information Technology?

Created for school counselors by Counselors for Computing (C4C), a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance made possible by the Merck Company Foundation, this card gives adults talking points and additional resources for a conversation with their students, children, and/or other young people. The main message is that IT offers meaningful work, security and high salaries with a bachelor’s degree, and flexibility and variety. Information is provided to address these specific questions: What should you tell a young person about a career in IT?

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Critical Listening Guide: Just Because You Always Hear It, Doesn't Mean It's True

Use this guide to help identify common misunderstandings that surface when people talk about how to increase the participation of women.  Learn to spot "red flags" that indicate a particular discussion is headed in a direction that may not be research-based or effective.

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Results of a Large-Scale, Multi-Institutional Study of Undergraduate Retention in Computing

The recent upsurge in enrollments in computing means that student attrition has a substantial opportunity cost. Admitting a student who leaves both reduces graduation yield and prevents another equally qualified student from enrolling. Professors cannot change the background of students, but they can control many aspects of student experience in the computing major. This paper presents the results of a study to understand strongest predictors of retention in undergraduate computing based on a large-scale survey administered in 14 U.S.

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How Do You Support Completion of Graduate Degrees and Engender Commitment to a Research Career?

Students most likely to complete their graduate studies are those who are viewed as junior colleagues in a positive relationship with their advisors and who are well integrated into their department’s or lab’s intellectual community.

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Pair Programming-in-a-Box: The Power of Collaborative Learning

Pair Programming-in-a-Box: The Power of Collaborative Learning

Pair programming is a collaborative learning method in which students program in pairs instead of individually. This approach significantly improves college students' programming competency and increases the likelihood that both male and female students become and remain computer science majors. During pair programming, students work in tandem at one computer while completing regular programming assignments. The "driver" controls the mouse and keyboard while the "navigator" makes suggestions, points out errors, and asks questions.

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