Resources

Pipeline-in-a-Box

Pipeline-in-a-Box: Promoting Advancement of CS/IT Students from Two-Year to Four-Year Institutions

Are you ready to transform the lives of community college students and diversify the computer science (CS) and information technology (IT) student body at four-year institutions? Let Pipeline-in-a-Box: Promoting Advancement of CS/IT Students From Two-Year to Four-Year Institutionsease the way.

Gearing Up for Change

Gearing Up for Change: Institutional Reform in Undergraduate Computing Programs

Change agents must understand and consider their organization’s complex and interlocking systems. Plans for change must ensure that subsystems work in harmony with each other to reinforce the envisioned change. This resource outlines the prerequisites to transforming for diversity in undergraduate computing and explains NCWIT’s Extension Services for Undergraduate Programs (ES-UP).

Why Should Young Women Consider a Career in Information Technology?

Why Should Young Women Consider a Career in Information Technology?

This card gives adults talking points and additional resources for a conversation with their daughters and/or other young people. The main message is that IT offers meaningful work, security and high salaries with a bachelor’s degree, and flexibility and variety. Information is provided to address these specific questions: What should you tell a young woman about a career in IT? How can a young woman prepare now for a career in IT?

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How Do Stereotype Threats Affect Retention?

Stereotype threat harms both performance and motivation by reducing our feelings of competence, belonging, and trust in our colleagues. However, careful thought, education, and regular assessment of diversity practices can help minimize incidents of stereotype threat.

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How Can You Re-Engineer Your Undergraduate Program to Increase Women's Representation in Computing? Small Steps Toward Systemic Change (Case Study 1)

How Can You Re-Engineer Your Undergraduate Program to Increase Women’s Representation in Computing?

The socio-educational system a student experiences shapes participation in the major. Altering one element of that system is often not enough to create enduring change. When faculty members are ready to implement organizational innovation, success is more likely if they receive support from institutional leaders, have access to adequate resources, and are able to participate in decision-making about the change.

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How Do You Support Completion of Graduate Degrees and Engender Commitment to a Research Career?

Students most likely to complete their graduate studies are those who are viewed as junior colleagues in a positive relationship with their advisors and who are well integrated into their department’s or lab’s intellectual community.

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How Do Admissions Criteria Affect Women’s Representation in Graduate Computing?

When admission committee members minimize the biasing effects of stereotypes and consider applicants’ membership in an under-represented group as a positive characteristic, they promote diversity.

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Mentoring-in-a-Box: Women Faculty in Computing

Mentoring-in-a-Box: Women Faculty in Computing

Women in scientific disciplines face challenges that range from institutionalized bias to differences in communication styles and a lack of female role models. Mentoring-in-a-Box: Women Faculty in Computing can help you start and sustain a successful mentoring relationship.

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How Do You Retain Women through Collaborative Learning?

Collaborative learning can improve retention rates, critical thinking, appreciation of diversity, and development of social and professional skills. When implementing collaborative learning, match students roughly according to experience levels and make sure to give students opportunities to work together for both graded and un-graded assignments.

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Information Technology: How the power of IT and the power of women will power the future

Information Technology: How the power of IT and the power of women will power the future

A report on the importance of IT to our future, and why women's participation matters.

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How Do You Provide Intentional Role Modeling?

In addition to demonstrating expertise and experience, intentional role models display their strengths and weaknesses and help observers see how they could attain a similar position. Role modeling is less interactive than mentoring, but is often a component of mentoring relationships.

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What Makes Electronic Mentoring Effective?

By removing time and location constraints, e-mentoring allows women to connect with many more women than face-to-face mentoring permits. It can also promote more open mentor-protégé communication by limiting status differences.

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How Do You Mentor Faculty Women?

Faculty mentoring programs help junior faculty to acclimate and promote relationships that can cover a broad range of topics. These programs enhance career commitment and self-confidence in women. Successful programs initiate mentor pairings early for new faculty and formally facilitate the relationship until the mentor-protégé bond is established.

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