Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

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Student influencers such as formal and informal educators and parents are eager to direct students to viable education opportunities in computing. Consider these key points and resources that can be used to integrate computing skills into existing curricula, encourage diverse participation in computing, and/or connect students to informal learning environments that emphasize hands-on experience with technology.

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School counselors are eager to direct students to viable education and career opportunities. Consider these key points for collaboration as you plan to meet with counselors to discuss ways their professional responsibilities align with your goals to increase student access to computing.

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Ensuring that your technical conference provides a welcome environment for a wide range of attendees is important for broadening participation in technology. Use these tips to help you create a more inclusive and welcoming conference experience for all.

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Computer Science-in-a-Box: Unplug Your Curriculum introduces fundamental building blocks of computer science -- without using computers. Use it with students ages 9 to 14 to teach lessons about how computers work, while addressing critical mathematics and science concepts such as number systems, algorithms, and manipulating variables and logic.

Set of ten TECHNOLOchicas 11"x17" posters.

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This is the third of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing.

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Careers with Code magazine is a guide for middle and high school students, and anyone else interested in future careers that mix computer science with their skills, interests, and passion – giving you the ability to change the world! It's free to read online or download.

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Let students see that combining computer science with things they are passionate about can give them the skills to make a real difference in the world.

This poster is one of three Counselors for Computing (C4C) posters, developed in collaboration with CareerswithCode.com and produced by Refraction Media: ncwit.org/CwCposters.

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Show that computer science is integral to daily life — even if you can’t see it. You might ask students, “What else belongs on this poster?”

This poster is one of three Counselors for Computing (C4C) posters, developed in collaboration with CareerswithCode.com and produced by Refraction Media: ncwit.org/CwCposters.

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Students see just ten of the many ways computer science is making the world a better place. Encourage them to imagine more.

This poster is one of three Counselors for Computing (C4C) posters, developed in collaboration with CareerswithCode.com and produced by Refraction Media: ncwit.org/CwCposters.

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Tapestry Workshop-in-a-Box contains materials for organizing professional development workshops that train high school educators in research-based, field-tested ways to attract and retain more and diverse students to computing courses. This Box includes information about the objectives and content of a Tapestry Workshop; advice on logistics and budgeting; suggestions for selecting participants and presenters; and a sample agenda, templates, and evaluation tools.

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This is the second of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing. This article focuses on 2016 Engagement Excellence awardees Elizabeth Boese from the University of Colorado at Boulder and Mark LeBlanc from Wheaton College (Massachusetts). They were recognized for introductory CS course materials that made use of exceptionally creative interdisciplinary connections to computing.

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Previous research has suggested that access and exposure to computing, social supports, preparatory privilege, a sense of belonging in computing, and a computing identity all contribute to women pursuing computing as a field of study or intended career. A recent study explores what helps young women persist in computing despite the obstacles they encounter.

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In August 2016, representatives from more than 40 non-profit, industry, media, education, and policy organizations gathered for a Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable, hosted by NCWIT and Google, to discuss influence, intersectionality, and media messaging. Participants reported increased awareness about the importance of encouraging and supporting black women and girls through tangible resources and actions.

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Intel, in partnership with NCWIT, hosted Growing the Legacy of Native American Leadership in Science and Technology: A Thought Leadership Event. Key leaders in academia, government, tribal nations, non-profit organizations, and the tech industry convened to discuss the state of technology in Native American communities, identify gaps, and create actionable steps for increasing Native American student participation and retention in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education.

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