Resources

Key Practices for Retaining Undergraduates in Computing

Key Practices for Retaining Undergraduates in Computing

Based in research on women’s participation in computing, this document outlines a model of the system of undergraduate experiences that affect retention in undergraduate programs. To create and sustain excellence through diversity, effective practices must be mainstreamed into the experiences of all students, not just those of women or minorities. For more information on the Extension Services program, visit https://www.ncwit.org/project/extension-services-undergraduate-programs.

How can I prepare for a computing major?

How can I prepare for a computing major?

Produced with the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA), this card gives computing-specific advice for the steps to take on the path from high school to college.

Top 10 Ways to Retain Students in Computing

Top 10 Ways You Can Retain Students in Computing

This brief, easy-to-share resource highlights the top ten evidence-based ways to retain undergraduate students in computing.

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Computing: Get the Most Out of Your College Degree

Computing offers high quality jobs and is one of the fastest growing occupations in the United States. This resource compares computing to other occupations on quality of life issues such as pay, educational requirements, and work hours, to assist young women and their advisors in deciding whether computing is right for them.

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A Lucrative, Secure Computing Career: Community College Can Take You There

This poster highlights the importance of community colleges to educating the computing workforce. It connects various pathways into community colleges, outlines some of key components of the community college experience, and details some of the high paying technical careers these students will be working toward. The poster was developed in collaboration with the Academic Alliance's Community College Subcommittee.

Why Should Young Women Consider a Career in Information Technology?

Why Should Young Women Consider a Career in Information Technology?

This card gives adults talking points and additional resources for a conversation with their daughters and/or other young people. The main message is that IT offers meaningful work, security and high salaries with a bachelor’s degree, and flexibility and variety. Information is provided to address these specific questions: What should you tell a young woman about a career in IT? How can a young woman prepare now for a career in IT?

Survey-in-a-Box

Survey-in-a-Box: Student Experience of the Major

Use the Survey-in-a-Box: Student Experience of the Major (SEM) to identify strengths and areas for improving your department’s efforts to retain students. The Survey-in-a-Box contains a full survey, with specific modules that can be used together or independently; an instruction manual; guidelines for getting human research approval when needed; information on how to administer paper and online versions of the survey; suggestions for action based on survey results; and much more.

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Top 10 Ways to Engage Underrepresented Students in Computing

These tips will help you to engage students in your computing courses and retain them in the major. These ideas and examples are drawn from theory and research conducted by social scientists who study issues related to diversity and retention in computing. Methods range from encouraging words to inclusive classroom environments.

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Mentoring-in-a-Box: Women Faculty in Computing

Mentoring-in-a-Box: Women Faculty in Computing

Women in scientific disciplines face challenges that range from institutionalized bias to differences in communication styles and a lack of female role models. Mentoring-in-a-Box: Women Faculty in Computing can help you start and sustain a successful mentoring relationship.

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NCWIT Tips: 7 Tips for Conducting Inclusive Faculty Searches

Subtle barriers might be preventing you from hiring the best available candidates. These tips will help you conduct inclusive searches that appeal to women and people from other underrepresented groups.

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Which computing pathway is right for me?

Which computing pathway is right for me?

This card, co-branded by the six founding PACE (Partnership for Advancing Computing Education) organizations, explains how computing interests and talents line up with different undergraduate courses of study and the careers that follow.

EngageCSEdu

EngageCSEdu (website)

EngageCSEdu is a website that encourages the development of more inclusive learning environments in introductory computer science (CS) courses by helping faculty to easily share their most effective retention practices. EngageCSEdu offers thousands of projects, homework assignments, and other course materials that are searchable by computer science knowledge area, programming language, and more. All course materials are developed by faculty members nationwide and evaluated for quality by an interdisciplinary team of computer scientists, learning scientists, and diversity experts.

Strategic Planning for Recruiting Women into Undergraduate Computing: High Yield in the Short Term

Strategic Planning for Recruiting Women into Undergraduate Computing: High Yield in the Short Term (2015 update)

This workbook includes examples, guidance, and templates for developing a strategic recruitment plan to increase participation of females in undergraduate computing. Visit the Extension Services webpage for more information.

By the Numbers

By the Numbers

NCWIT's Women in IT: By the Numbers presents the most compelling statistics on women's participation in IT on a single page.

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How Do You Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy?

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students.

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