Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

By the Numbers

By the Numbers

Check out the most compelling statistics on women's participation in computing on a single page.

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NCWIT Scorecard: The Status of Women in Computing [2019 Update]

The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.

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NCWIT Tips: 13 Tips for Creating and Sustaining a Women in Computing Group on Your Campus

Women in Computing (WIC) groups on college and university campuses can help reduce feelings of isolation and increase a sense of community and belonging. They can also be places where members can discuss difficulties they encounter and strategies for addressing these challenges in the larger community. But sometimes, women’s groups can also produce unintended consequences (e.g. convey the idea that women are a homogenous group or need "extra help"). Use the following tips to avoid these pitfalls and to ensure the success of your WIC group.

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The Beautiful Noise of Peer Instruction: An Interview with Beth Simon

An often overlooked way to broaden participation in computing is to grow a more inclusive student community and culture. A good way to build this community is to employ well-structured collaborative learning opportunities in your courses. (Remember: "well-structured" is key!) In this EngageCSEdu Inroads column, we explore Peer Instruction, a technique with a large body of supporting research, with UCSD Professor Beth Simon.

Read more from the interview with Beth Simon here.

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Computation Creativity: An Interview with UNL’s Elizabeth Ingraham and Leen-Kiat Soh

Learn more about using Computation Creativity activities in your introductory computing courses to engage your students and to improve their learning. In this March 2018 issue of ACM Inroads magazine, NCWIT Research Scientist and EngageCSEdu Director Beth Quinn interviews Professors Liz Ingraham and Leen-Kiat Soh. Professors Ingraham and Soh, along with other colleagues from University of Nebraska, are building and testing off-line activities for developing students' creative computational thinking, or "Computational Creativity." Dr.

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NCWIT Tips: 13 Tips to Make Technical Conferences More Inclusive

Ensuring that your technical conference provides a welcome environment for a wide range of attendees is important for broadening participation in technology. Use these tips to help you create a more inclusive and welcoming conference experience for all.

View online.

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Making Interdisciplinary Connections to Engage Students

This is the second of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing. This article focuses on 2016 Engagement Excellence awardees Elizabeth Boese from the University of Colorado at Boulder and Mark LeBlanc from Wheaton College (Massachusetts). They were recognized for introductory CS course materials that made use of exceptionally creative interdisciplinary connections to computing.

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Efforts to Make Computer Science More Inclusive of Women

This article in a special issue of ACM Inroads magazine describes recent initiatives by NCWIT, ACM-W, and Anita Borg Institute to broaden participation in computing.

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Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable: Executive Brief

In August 2016, representatives from more than 40 non-profit, industry, media, education, and policy organizations gathered for a Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable, hosted by NCWIT and Google, to discuss influence, intersectionality, and media messaging. Participants reported increased awareness about the importance of encouraging and supporting black women and girls through tangible resources and actions.

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Collaborating to Grow the Pathway of Native Americans in STEM: White Paper

Intel, in partnership with NCWIT, hosted Growing the Legacy of Native American Leadership in Science and Technology: A Thought Leadership Event. Key leaders in academia, government, tribal nations, non-profit organizations, and the tech industry convened to discuss the state of technology in Native American communities, identify gaps, and create actionable steps for increasing Native American student participation and retention in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education.

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NCWIT Tips: 11 Ways to Design More Inclusive Academic Websites

Your computing department’s website is an important source of information for current and prospective students. These tips will help you create a website that welcomes diverse students and effectively promotes computing and your department.

View online.

Strategic Planning for Recruiting Women into Undergraduate Computing: High Yield in the Short Term

Strategic Planning for Recruiting Women into Undergraduate Computing: High Yield in the Short Term (2015 update)

This workbook includes examples, guidance, and templates for developing a strategic recruitment plan to increase participation of females in undergraduate computing. Visit the Extension Services webpage for more information.

Survey-in-a-Box

Survey-in-a-Box: Student Experience of the Major

Use the Survey-in-a-Box: Student Experience of the Major (SEM) to identify strengths and areas for improving your department’s efforts to retain students. The Survey-in-a-Box contains a full survey, with specific modules that can be used together or independently; an instruction manual; guidelines for getting human research approval when needed; information on how to administer paper and online versions of the survey; suggestions for action based on survey results; and much more.

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How Do You Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy?

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students.

View the research

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NCWIT Tips: 7 Tips for Conducting Inclusive Faculty Searches

Subtle barriers might be preventing you from hiring the best available candidates. These tips will help you conduct inclusive searches that appeal to women and people from other underrepresented groups.

View online.

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