Statistics & Reports

Male Advocates and Allies (report cover)

Male Advocates and Allies: Promoting Gender Diversity in Technology Workplaces

This report, sponsored by NCWIT's Workforce Alliance, provides an inside look into how men think about and advocate for diversity in the technical workplace. Drawing from interviews with 47 men in technical companies and departments, this study: 1) Identifies the factors that motivate or hinder men in advocating for gender diversity, 2) explores what diversity efforts men have experienced as successful or unsuccessful, and 3) identifies specific strategies to increase men's participation in advocacy.

Who Invents IT Thumbnail

Who Invents IT? Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, 2012 Update

The original 2007 report, Who Invents IT? An Analysis of Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, examined the rates at which women have been patenting in information technology (IT), how these rates have evolved between 1980-2005, and how these rates differ across IT industry sub-categories and across specific organizations. This edition updates the previous report, exploring these trends from 2006-2010.

Preview Image

Exploring Inquiry Learning: An EngageCSEdu Author and a User Discuss POGIL

This is the third of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing. This article focuses on 2016 Engagement Excellence awardees Elizabeth Boese from the University of Colorado at Boulder and Mark LeBlanc from Wheaton College (Massachusetts). They were recognized for introductory CS course materials that made use of exceptionally creative interdisciplinary connections to computing.

Assessing Girls’ Interest, Confidence, and Participation in Computing Activities: Results for Globaloria in West Virginia

This report examines the effects of participation in Globaloria on girls' interests, confidence, and participation in computing activities by analyzing pre- and post- test data for Globaloria participants and enrollment data for Globaloria elective courses. Results demonstrate that outcomes of Globaloria participation among girls include an increase in several home computing activities for girls, and that total female enrollment in elective Globaloria courses is higher than the national average for female enrollment in computing courses.

Which gender differences matter for high-tech entrepreneurship? (Published in Open Source Business Resource, July 2011)

This article was published in Open Source Business Resource. With data from successful founders of high-tech companies, we identify traits common to large majorities of them and any gender differences in those traits. There are few. Further, we identify criteria that might lead to gender imbalance among successful founders by comparing similarities and differences in the gender distribution of these traits among the general population and among successful founders.

Summaries of Selected Research of SSAB Members and Visitors to 2012 NCWIT Summit

Members of the Social Science Advisory Board (SSAB) support the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) through their research and knowledge about women and information technology.  The depth and breadth of perspectives and approaches that SSAB members and visitors bring to the study of women and computing are illustrated in examples of their recent research projects.  In the research summaries that follow, we see expertise across social science fields, and theoretical and empirical issues and findings with implications for diversity and the full participation of wome

Girls in IT: The Facts (infographic)

Girls in IT: The Facts Infographic

This attention-getting infographic summarizes the key findings from the Girls in IT report. Use this piece to raise awareness about ways to increase girls' participation in computing.

View infographic

Get girls into computing: Free, evidence-based materials from the National Center for Women & Information Technology (published in Journal for Computing Teachers, Summer 2011)

This editor-reviewed article in the Journal for Computing Teachers, Summer 2011 Edition, provides a detailed overview of the many free, easy-to-use publications available online for educators interested in attracting more students to computing.

Girls in IT: The Facts (report)

Girls in IT: The Facts

Girls in IT: The Facts, sponsored by NCWIT's K-12 Alliance, is a synthesis of the existing literature on increasing girls’ participation in computing. It aims to bring together this latest research so that readers can gain a clearer and more coherent picture of 1) the current state of affairs for girls in computing, 2) the key barriers to increasing girls’ participation in these fields, and 3) promising practices for addressing these barriers.

Preview Image

Multiple Factors Converge to Influence Women’s Persistence in Computing: A Qualitative Analysis

Previous research has suggested that access and exposure to computing, social supports, preparatory privilege, a sense of belonging in computing, and a computing identity all contribute to women pursuing computing as a field of study or intended career. A recent study explores what helps young women persist in computing despite the obstacles they encounter.

Preview Image

Making Interdisciplinary Connections to Engage Students

This is the second of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing. This article focuses on 2016 Engagement Excellence awardees Elizabeth Boese from the University of Colorado at Boulder and Mark LeBlanc from Wheaton College (Massachusetts). They were recognized for introductory CS course materials that made use of exceptionally creative interdisciplinary connections to computing.

Preview Image

Efforts to Make Computer Science More Inclusive of Women

This article in a special issue of ACM Inroads magazine describes recent initiatives by NCWIT, ACM-W, and Anita Borg Institute to broaden participation in computing.

Preview Image

Collaborating to Grow the Pathway of Native Americans in STEM: White Paper

Intel, in partnership with NCWIT, hosted Growing the Legacy of Native American Leadership in Science and Technology: A Thought Leadership Event. Key leaders in academia, government, tribal nations, non-profit organizations, and the tech industry convened to discuss the state of technology in Native American communities, identify gaps, and create actionable steps for increasing Native American student participation and retention in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education.

Preview Image

Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable: Executive Brief

In August 2016, representatives from more than 40 non-profit, industry, media, education, and policy organizations gathered for a Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable, hosted by NCWIT and Google, to discuss influence, intersectionality, and media messaging. Participants reported increased awareness about the importance of encouraging and supporting black women and girls through tangible resources and actions.

Preview Image

10 Actionable Ways to Actually Increase Diversity in Tech

Tech's diversity problem is not new information, especially to those of us who work in the industry. There is a trend taking hold in tech companies over the past few years: publishing diversity stats. While taking a hard look in the mirror is an important step in addressing diversity issues, taking additional steps to implement meaningful change efforts is also important. But what steps are most effective?

By the Numbers

By the Numbers

NCWIT's Women in IT: By the Numbers presents the most compelling statistics on women's participation in IT on a single page.

Thumbnail Image

Women in Tech: The Facts (2016 Update)

One of NCWIT’s most popular reports has been updated for 2016. See what’s changed and what hasn’t. Women in Tech: The Facts brings together the latest findings from recent research on technical women including the current state of affairs for technical women, a summary of the key barriers to women's participation in technology, promising practices for addressing these barriers, and tools to support your organization's change efforts.

Technology and Sexuality – What's The Connection?

Technology and Sexuality – What's The Connection? Addressing Youth Sexualities in Efforts to Increase Girls' Participation in Computing

This article demonstrates the importance of paying attention to youth sexualities in efforts to increase girls’ participation in computing.  It illustrates significant ways sexuality may be thwarting our efforts to increase girls’ participation in technology and how we might improve these efforts. In addition, it highlights how we might use girls’ interest in sexuality as a potentially powerful resource for fostering their interest in computing.

Preview Image

What is the Impact of Gender Diversity on Technology Business Performance? Research Summary

This report provides a comprehensive review of current research on gender-diverse teams. Despite their challenges, they demonstrate superior productivity and financial performance compared with homogenous teams.
 
In addition to summarizing recent research on financial performance, team dynamics, and organizational effectiveness, this summary also reviews strategies to maximize the potential benefits of gender diversity on technical teams.
 
 
NCWIT Scorecard

NCWIT Scorecard: A Report on the Status of Women in Information Technology

The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.

Pages