Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

NCWIT Tips for Startup Members

NCWIT Tips for Startup Members is a series of action items to help you implement or improve recruitment and retention practices, avoid unconscious bias, manage talent, and more.

Latinas & Tecnología de la Información

Latinas & Tecnología de la Información is a Spanish-language website for inspiring young Hispanic women, or Latinas, to pursue technology. The website, containing both English-language and Spanish-language resources, provides:

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This guide, created by the Extension Services program, helps you find resources for attracting undergraduate women into computing and retaining them through graduation, including tools for assessing your efforts. For more information on the Extension Services program, visit https://www.ncwit.org/project/extension-services-undergraduate-programs.

Male Advocates and Allies (report cover)

This report, sponsored by NCWIT's Workforce Alliance, provides an inside look into how men think about and advocate for diversity in the technical workplace. Drawing from interviews with 47 men in technical companies and departments, this study: 1) Identifies the factors that motivate or hinder men in advocating for gender diversity, 2) explores what diversity efforts men have experienced as successful or unsuccessful, and 3) identifies specific strategies to increase men's participation in advocacy.

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Recruiting diverse students to computing requires that you spark their interest, build their confidence they can succeed, create a community where they feel like they belong, and help them see themselves as a "computing person." This Top 10 list offers practices that help you recruit high school girls to your computing courses.

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NCWIT AspireIT: Grant Recipient

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NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award: Recipient

Display the "NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award: Recipient" badge at your site.

NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing: Award Recipient

Display the "NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing: Award Recipient" badge at your site.

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Computing-related jobs are interesting, well-paying, secure, and abundant, so why aren't more women working in this creative field that produces the technology that is central to our daily lives?

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Encouragement increases self-efficacy, which is the belief in one’s ability to successfully perform a task. Because we are more likely to engage in tasks that we believe we can perform successfully, encouragement may be especially useful for attracting women to male-stereotyped fields such as computing.

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AgentCubes-in-a-Box Cover

Introduce students to computer science through AgentCubes, a powerful and engaging 2-D and 3-D programming tool. By completing the lessons in this program-in-a-box your middle school students will learn to program their own games and simulation worlds, and in the process learn the fundamentals of computer science.

Girls in IT: The Facts (report)

Girls in IT: The Facts, sponsored by NCWIT's K-12 Alliance, is a synthesis of the existing literature on increasing girls’ participation in computing. It aims to bring together this latest research so that readers can gain a clearer and more coherent picture of 1) the current state of affairs for girls in computing, 2) the key barriers to increasing girls’ participation in these fields, and 3) promising practices for addressing these barriers.

Top 10 Ways to Thrive in Your Technical Career

This resource provides tips mid-career technical women can use to advance their careers.

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Girls in IT: The Facts (infographic)

This attention-getting infographic summarizes the key findings from the Girls in IT report. Use this piece to raise awareness about ways to increase girls' participation in computing.

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Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects.

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