2019 NCWIT Summit Resources

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Set of eleven TECHNOLOchicas 3.0 11"x17" posters.

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There is consensus among researchers that encouragement matters and plays a critical role in engaging more young women and girls in computing. Here are some key highlights from published research studies, and follow-up tips on practicing encouragement.

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Check out the most compelling statistics on women's participation in computing on a single page.

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Achieving equity in the tech industry must be intersectional: race, class, gender, sexuality, and other key factors of identity shape experiences differently; and understanding those differences is critical to promoting diversity, inclusion, and change for women, girls, and other underrepresented groups in IT.

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This Guide was created to support the use of evidence-based interventions by change leaders. It can help researchers to avoid jargon and communicate effectively. This resource is intended to help readers design an overall communication strategy. Steps include identifying goals and philosophy, deciding whether to translate at all, carefully analyzing specific audiences, and based on these, developing a user-centered communication strategy.

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Use this guide to help identify common misunderstandings that surface when people talk about how to increase the participation of women.  Learn to spot "red flags" that indicate a particular discussion is headed in a direction that may not be research-based or effective.

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Student influencers such as formal and informal educators and parents are eager to direct students to viable education opportunities in computing. Consider these key points and resources that can be used to integrate computing skills into existing curricula, encourage diverse participation in computing, and/or connect students to informal learning environments that emphasize hands-on experience with technology.

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Find a variety of surveys, observation forms, self-evaluation worksheets, and more that you can use “as is” or adapt for your own evaluation purposes. There are instruments that can be used to help you evaluate K-12, workplace, and post-secondary interventions.

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The design and décor of the physical spaces where people work contain signals about who does and who does not belong there. When we view these spaces through a diversity of perspectives, we can reveal features that signal exclusion to many people in subtle or overt ways — as well as opportunities where we can intentionally signal inclusion for a broad range of people.

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La tecnología es un campo de rápido crecimiento, con salarios altos y creativo. He aquí 10 consejos para que usted, como miembro de la familia, pueda estimular a las niñas a su alrededor a estudiar y a hacer una carrera profesional en ciencias informáticas y tecnología relacionada.

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Modern Figures Podcast

Modern Figures Podcast (http://modernfigurespodcast.com/) guest stars Black women in computing who share their stories and perspectives on technical, societal, and personal topics. Geared toward women of color in STEM, especially high school and college students, the podcast also highlights the interestingly relatable, pivotal moments along their journey in computing. 

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NCWIT AspireIT is designed to teach K-12 girls programming fundamentals and computational thinking in fun, creative, and hands-on environments. AspireIT participants are ultimately encouraged to contribute their unique perspectives and ideas to future innovations. This attention-getting infographic summarizes who can get involved and the support that they will receive from NCWIT.

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The NCWIT Engagement Practices Framework outlines actions faculty can take in their classrooms and beyond to help broaden participation in computing. It is organized around three evidence-based principles for engaging and retaining all students: Make It Matter, Grow Inclusive Student Community, and Build Student Confidence and Professional Identity. Within this resource, you will find tips for implementing each practice, some examples, and links to resources to learn more.

Messaging Toolkit

NCWIT has developed a new messaging platform that emphasizes the creative potential for organizations that invest in fostering a culture where girls, women, and underrepresented groups participate with strong voices. The headline, “The idea you don’t have is the voice you haven’t heard,” and the tagline, “Inclusion changes what’s possible,” are confident expressions of what we know is true: Diversity and inclusion enhance outcomes in technological innovation for educational institutions and businesses of all sizes. 

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The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.

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Women in Computing (WIC) groups on college and university campuses can help reduce feelings of isolation and increase a sense of community and belonging. They can also be places where members can discuss difficulties they encounter and strategies for addressing these challenges in the larger community. But sometimes, women’s groups can also produce unintended consequences (e.g. convey the idea that women are a homogenous group or need "extra help"). Use the following tips to avoid these pitfalls and to ensure the success of your WIC group.

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Advancing K-16 computing education in a state is a complex and collaborative endeavor. Computing education state summits are an important part of this process and can help to develop and advance a state’s strategy both for expanding computing education access and for broadening participation in computing (BPC). In particular, summits can promote equity and democratize change efforts by giving voice to all stakeholders in a collaborative and action-oriented environment.
 
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Mentoring programs are an excellent way to support graduate students’ sense of belonging in the local intellectual community and help them move forward in their professional careers. Everyone benefits from mentoring, including the mentors themselves, especially when both mentors and mentees are fully committed to the relationship.

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Task assignment is a key area where bias emerges, exacerbating workplace inequity. Research shows that women and members of other underrepresented groups are more often channeled into “execution” or project management roles and are less likely to receive high-value, high-visibility, or stretch assignments (Hewlett et al., 2008; 2014). 
 
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Technology is a fast-growing, high-paying, creative field. Here are 10 ways that you, as a family member, can encourage the girls in your life to study, and have a career in, computer science and related technology fields.

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School counselors are eager to direct students to viable education and career opportunities. Consider these key points for collaboration as you plan to meet with counselors to discuss ways their professional responsibilities align with your goals to increase student access to computing.

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This report provides a comprehensive review of current research on gender-diverse teams. Despite their challenges, they demonstrate superior productivity and financial performance compared with homogenous teams.
 
In addition to summarizing recent research on financial performance, team dynamics, and organizational effectiveness, this summary also reviews strategies to maximize the potential benefits of gender diversity on technical teams.
 
 
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This workbook will help educators and influencers understand the research-based reasons why a diverse range of girls are less likely to take computing courses in high school. High school teachers are provided with actionable recommendations for creating recruiting and outreach interventions that work.