Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

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This poster highlights the importance of community colleges to educating the computing workforce. It connects various pathways into community colleges, outlines some of key components of the community college experience, and details some of the high paying technical careers these students will be working toward. The poster was developed in collaboration with the Academic Alliance's Community College Subcommittee.

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This report provides a comprehensive review of current research on gender-diverse teams. Despite their challenges, they demonstrate superior productivity and financial performance compared with homogenous teams.
 
In addition to summarizing recent research on financial performance, team dynamics, and organizational effectiveness, this summary also reviews strategies to maximize the potential benefits of gender diversity on technical teams.
 
 
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Learn about some of the hidden barriers that often prevent technical organizations from hiring and retaining top talent. This video will take you through a series of engaging, interactive experiments that introduce the concept of unconscious bias and explain why this information is vital for technical companies to understand. The video will also point to free NCWIT resources you can use to address these hidden barriers in order to better attract and retain a diverse workforce that will drive future innovation.

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These tips will help you to engage students in your computing courses and retain them in the major. These ideas and examples are drawn from theory and research conducted by social scientists who study issues related to diversity and retention in computing. Methods range from encouraging words to inclusive classroom environments.

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Effective feedback gives students information they actually use to increase their learning and improve their performance. It should employ a "growth mindset" that focuses on developing intelligence through effort, practice, and "wise feedback" that spurs additional effort.

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Effective feedback gives employees information they can realistically use to increase their learning and improve their performance. It abandons a "fixed mindset" that sees skills as "innate abilities" and instead employs a "growth mindset" that sees skills as developed through continued effort and practice.

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Use these tips to identify likely male advocates. Also use this resource to spark discussion or role-play how you might put these tips into action in your own organization. These ideas and quotes are taken from research NCWIT conducted with males in technical workplaces.

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Once you have identified potential advocates, use these tips to increase their advocacy. These ideas and quotes are drawn from research NCWIT conducted with male advocates in technical workplaces. Tips range from ways of raising awareness to technologies for encouraging activism.

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Use the e-Textiles-in-a-Box tutorial and get ready to teach young people about electronics and computing. Based on the Computational Textiles Curriculum and Sew Electric from MIT, e-Textiles-in-a-Box provides instructions for sewing soft circuits and programming an Arduino microprocessor on the way to creating a bookmark book light and an interactive felt monster that lights up and sings. NCWIT is pleased to offer e-Textiles-in-a-Box in cooperation with the MIT High-Low Tech Group, and with funding from the National Science Foundation.

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The recent upsurge in enrollments in computing means that student attrition has a substantial opportunity cost. Admitting a student who leaves both reduces graduation yield and prevents another equally qualified student from enrolling. Professors cannot change the background of students, but they can control many aspects of student experience in the computing major. This paper presents the results of a study to understand strongest predictors of retention in undergraduate computing based on a large-scale survey administered in 14 U.S.

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Regional Celebrations-in-a-Box contains resources for organizing small conferences designed to increase the participation, retention, and advancement of technical women. This program-in-a-box is a compilation of materials and practices from Regional Celebrations around the country that bring women together in supportive communities for professional growth. The box includes advice about planning and materials for program elements such as intentional role modeling, group and individual mentoring, networking, and ways to share accurate career information.

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This Top 10 resource offers recommendations for attracting and hiring highly qualified diverse technical employees into start-up companies. The recommendations include attention to casting a wide inclusive net, stereotyped language and decor, as well as some more cutting-edge approaches.

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Are you interested in getting more girls involved in your computing competition? This Top 10 resource offers simple suggestions to make your competition appeal to a wider range of participants. Taking these steps will benefit all students and help make your event a success. 

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Article in CACM describing the obstacles girls face in entering computing and how the Aspirations program seeks to overcome those. Great overview of issues, the Aspirations program and ways individuals can get involved with the program.

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