Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

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In honor of Black History Month (February 2020) and Women’s History Month (March 2020), NCWIT celebrates the contributions of black women and girls in computing by hosting a three-part virtual chat: “The Color of Our Future: An Online Conversation Series on the Empowerment and Inclusion of Black Women & Girls in Tech.” The series explores black girls in K-12, black women in postsecondary computing education, and black women in the tech workforce.

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The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.

Which computing pathway is right for me?

This resource, co-branded by the six founding PACE (Partnership for Advancing Computing Education) organizations, explains how computing interests and talents line up with different undergraduate courses of study and the careers that follow.

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Recruit strategically to attract a diverse range of students to your undergraduate computing program.

Moving Beyond Computer Literacy: Why schools should teach computer science

Computer Science (CS) — not computer literacy — underlies most innovation today, from biotechnology to geoscience to national security. Computer science teaches students design, logical reasoning, and problem solving — all valuable well beyond the computer science classroom. This resource provides information about the value of computer science curriculum for students, educators, local and national economies as well as global society. It offers steps schools can take to successfully incorporate computer science education.

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Spanish version of Why Should Young People Consider Careers in Computing and Information Technology?

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What should you tell a young person about IT careers? How can they prepare now for a career in IT?

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This self-guided course is designed for computing and information technology faculty and administrators who are beginning work on diversifying undergraduate computing programs or are trying to reignite existing initiatives. 

NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing Application Poster

The NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing (AiC) honors 9th-12th grade students who self-identify as women, genderqueer, or non-binary for their computing-related achievements and interests, and encourages them to pursue their passions. Use this poster to spread the word! Find out more at www.aspirations.org.

 

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Intersectionality is a critical and necessary concept to develop effective programs to broaden the participation of women and girls in computing. This resource provides a background and overview of the concept, in addition to key readings and resources related to women and girls of color in STEM and computing. 

 

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How can library staff attract girls to their coding and maker programs? This webinar by NCWIT Senior Research Scientist Lecia Barker and Homer, Alaska Youth Services Librarian Claudia Haines describes reasons girls may shy away from these programs and gives some practical advice for identifying target audiences and their influencers, messaging that addresses four important factors that affect involvement, and ways of making programs visible. 

Knowledge of computer science (CS) is fundamental to students’ future careers. This guide provides educators with context and concrete steps to build and expand inclusivity in CS education. By actively engaging students in CS, educators can build an even stronger pipeline of creativity and innovation to tackle the world’s challenges and help ensure students have the skills needed to thrive today and tomorrow.

Messaging Toolkit

NCWIT has developed a new messaging platform that emphasizes the creative potential for organizations that invest in fostering a culture where girls, women, and underrepresented groups participate with strong voices. The headline, “The idea you don’t have is the voice you haven’t heard,” and the tagline, “Inclusion changes what’s possible,” are confident expressions of what we know is true: Diversity and inclusion enhance outcomes in technological innovation for educational institutions and businesses of all sizes. 

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Mentoring programs are an excellent way to support graduate students’ sense of belonging in the local intellectual community and help them move forward in their professional careers. Everyone benefits from mentoring, including the mentors themselves, especially when both mentors and mentees are fully committed to the relationship.

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The design and décor of the physical spaces where people work contain signals about who does and who does not belong there. When we view these spaces through a diversity of perspectives, we can reveal features that signal exclusion to many people in subtle or overt ways — as well as opportunities where we can intentionally signal inclusion for a broad range of people.

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