New and Related Resources for the 2017 NCWIT Summit

Using #NCWITSummit, follow NCWIT on Twitter (@ncwit), Facebook (facebook.com/ncwit), Instagram (@ncwit), and Snapchat (snapchat.com/add/NCWIT), where we will share resources and assets related to the Summit.

 

We also recommend these resources, in addition to the listings below:

  • New to the Summit? View an orientation webinar online.
  • All Women Includes ALL Women: The Importance of Multiple Approaches to Intersectionality // We encourage and offer practical recommendations for change leaders to consider intersectionality in all of their outreach and reform efforts. Read the full blog online.

 


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Entrepreneurial Alliance (EA) Startup Toolkit

The Entrepreneurial Alliance (EA) Startup Toolkit is a collection of resources and recommendations to help small and growing companies with technical talent, learn how to create inclusive cultures, recruit and retain diverse employees, build diverse teams, and ensure that all employees are given opportunities to showcase their skills and are recognized for their technical contributions. Learn from NCWIT resources.

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NCWIT Tips: 13 Tips for Having Conversations About Flexible Work Options: For Managers

The first step toward an effective flexible workplace is for managers to create an environment where employees feel they can discuss available work-life options without being stigmatized. These tips can help managers create such an environment, followed by additional tips for actually having these conversations with employees.

View online.

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NCWIT Tips: 9 Tips for Having Conversations About Flexible Work Options: for Employees

These tips can help employees have effective conversations about flexible work options with their managers.

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By the Numbers

By the Numbers

NCWIT's Women in IT: By the Numbers presents the most compelling statistics on women's participation in IT on a single page.

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Critical Listening Guide: Just Because You Always Hear It, Doesn't Mean It's True

Use this guide to help identify common misunderstandings that surface when people talk about how to increase the participation of women.  Learn to spot "red flags" that indicate a particular discussion is headed in a direction that may not be research-based or effective.

View online.

Which computing pathway is right for me?

Which computing pathway is right for me?

This card, co-branded by the six founding PACE (Partnership for Advancing Computing Education) organizations, explains how computing interests and talents line up with different undergraduate courses of study and the careers that follow.

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Computing: Get the Most Out of Your College Degree

Computing offers high quality jobs and is one of the fastest growing occupations in the United States. This resource compares computing to other occupations on quality of life issues such as pay, educational requirements, and work hours, to assist young women and their advisors in deciding whether computing is right for them.

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Women in Tech: The Facts (2016 Update)

One of NCWIT’s most popular reports has been updated for 2016. See what’s changed and what hasn’t. Women in Tech: The Facts brings together the latest findings from recent research on technical women including the current state of affairs for technical women, a summary of the key barriers to women's participation in technology, promising practices for addressing these barriers, and tools to support your organization's change efforts.

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Institutional Barriers & Their Effects: How can I talk to colleagues about these issues?

Institutional barriers (IBs) are policies, procedures, or situations that systematically disadvantage certain groups of people. IBs exist in any majority-minority group situation. When an initial population is fairly similar (e.g., in male-dominated professions), systems naturally emerge to meet the needs of this population. If these systems do not change with the times, they can inhibit the success of new members with different needs. IBs often seem natural or “just the way things are around here.”

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Collaborating to Grow the Pathway of Native Americans in STEM: White Paper

Intel, in partnership with NCWIT, hosted Growing the Legacy of Native American Leadership in Science and Technology: A Thought Leadership Event. Key leaders in academia, government, tribal nations, non-profit organizations, and the tech industry convened to discuss the state of technology in Native American communities, identify gaps, and create actionable steps for increasing Native American student participation and retention in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education.

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How Can You Engage A Diverse Range of Girls in Technology?

Culturally Responsive Computing (CRC) programs help educators connect computing curriculum to the interests, prior experiences, and needs of students diverse in race, class, ability, and sexual orientation. One such promising program is COMPUGIRLS.

View the research

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How Do You Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy?

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students.

View the research

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NCWIT Tips: 8 Ways to Give Students More Effective Feedback Using a Growth Mindset

Effective feedback gives students information they actually use to increase their learning and improve their performance. It should employ a "growth mindset" that focuses on developing intelligence through effort, practice, and "wise feedback" that spurs additional effort.

View online.

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Results of a Large-Scale, Multi-Institutional Study of Undergraduate Retention in Computing

The recent upsurge in enrollments in computing means that student attrition has a substantial opportunity cost. Admitting a student who leaves both reduces graduation yield and prevents another equally qualified student from enrolling. Professors cannot change the background of students, but they can control many aspects of student experience in the computing major. This paper presents the results of a study to understand strongest predictors of retention in undergraduate computing based on a large-scale survey administered in 14 U.S.

Top 10 Ways to Retain Students in Computing

Top 10 Ways You Can Retain Students in Computing

This brief, easy-to-share resource highlights the top ten evidence-based ways to retain undergraduate students in computing.

View online.

Related resource:
  • EngageCSEdu: Foster diversity in your introductory computer science courses with quality content and engaging pedagogy.
Strategic Planning for Retaining Women in Undergraduate Computing

Strategic Planning for Retaining Women in Undergraduate Computing

This workbook presents some guidelines for strategically planning a multi-pronged approach to retain females — and all students — in undergraduate computing programs of study. For more information on the Extension Services program, visit https://www.ncwit.org/project/extension-services-undergraduate-programs.

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Interrupting Bias in Academic Settings

Use this resource to help you practice ways to interrupt bias in real-life situations.

Use the orange button to download a printable copy of this resource and facilitation guide.

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Interrupting Bias in Industry Settings

Use this resource to help you practice ways to interrupt bias in real-life situations.

Use the orange button to download a printable copy of this resource and facilitation guide.

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Unconscious Bias and Why It Matters For Women and Tech

Learn about some of the hidden barriers that often prevent technical organizations from hiring and retaining top talent. This video will take you through a series of engaging, interactive experiments that introduce the concept of unconscious bias and explain why this information is vital for technical companies to understand. The video will also point to free NCWIT resources you can use to address these hidden barriers in order to better attract and retain a diverse workforce that will drive future innovation.

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Evaluation Tools

Find a variety of surveys, observation forms, self-evaluation worksheets, and more that you can use “as is” or adapt for your own evaluation purposes. There are instruments that can be used to help you evaluate K-12, workplace, and post-secondary interventions.

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Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable: Executive Brief

In August 2016, representatives from more than 40 non-profit, industry, media, education, and policy organizations gathered for a Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable, hosted by NCWIT and Google, to discuss influence, intersectionality, and media messaging. Participants reported increased awareness about the importance of encouraging and supporting black women and girls through tangible resources and actions.

How Can Unbiased Software Facilitate Girls’ Interest in IT?

Educational software can increase students’ motivation, interest, and academic achievement in science and math. To do so, it must be selected and utilized properly to avoid gender bias. A sample tool for guiding software selection is provided.

View the research

EngageCSEdu

EngageCSEdu (website)

EngageCSEdu is a website that encourages the development of more inclusive learning environments in introductory computer science (CS) courses by helping faculty to easily share their most effective retention practices. EngageCSEdu offers thousands of projects, homework assignments, and other course materials that are searchable by computer science knowledge area, programming language, and more. All course materials are developed by faculty members nationwide and evaluated for quality by an interdisciplinary team of computer scientists, learning scientists, and diversity experts.

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EngageCSEdu Poster 2016 (11"x17")

Related resource:
  • EngageCSEdu: Foster diversity in your introductory computer science courses with quality content and engaging pedagogy.
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Male Allies and Advocates:* Helping Create Inclusive & Highly Productive Technology Workplaces

Girls in IT: The Facts (report)

Girls in IT: The Facts

Girls in IT: The Facts, sponsored by NCWIT's K-12 Alliance, is a synthesis of the existing literature on increasing girls’ participation in computing. It aims to bring together this latest research so that readers can gain a clearer and more coherent picture of 1) the current state of affairs for girls in computing, 2) the key barriers to increasing girls’ participation in these fields, and 3) promising practices for addressing these barriers.

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Sponsorship Toolkit

This toolkit contains a variety of resources for people seeking to advance sponsorship, for would-be sponsors, and for protégés looking for a sponsor. Use these tools to help you make the case for sponsorship in your organization, to help others understand the differences between mentors and sponsors, to help you identify potential sponsors, or to help you be an effective sponsor yourself.

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Top 10 Ways to Engage Underrepresented Students in Computing

These tips will help you to engage students in your computing courses and retain them in the major. These ideas and examples are drawn from theory and research conducted by social scientists who study issues related to diversity and retention in computing. Methods range from encouraging words to inclusive classroom environments.

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