Resources

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What’s Your Coding Super Power? (C4C Poster 24"x36")

When you show this poster, say to students, “Combining computer science with things you're passionate about can give you the skills to make a real difference in the world around you."

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Life in Code (C4C Poster 24"x36")

When you show this poster, tell students, "Computer science is part of your daily life—even if you can’t see it."

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Mission Possible (C4C Poster 24"x36")

When you share this poster, tell students it shows just ten of the many ways computer science is making the world a better place.

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Tapestry Workshop-in-a-Box

Tapestry Workshop-in-a-Box contains materials for organizing professional development workshops that train high school educators in research-based, field-tested ways to attract and retain more and diverse students to computing courses. This Box includes information about the objectives and content of a Tapestry Workshop; advice on logistics and budgeting; suggestions for selecting participants and presenters; and a sample agenda, templates, and evaluation tools.

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Making Interdisciplinary Connections to Engage Students

This is the second of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing. This article focuses on 2016 Engagement Excellence awardees Elizabeth Boese from the University of Colorado at Boulder and Mark LeBlanc from Wheaton College (Massachusetts). They were recognized for introductory CS course materials that made use of exceptionally creative interdisciplinary connections to computing.

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Resources for Increasing Participation and Transparency in Patenting

Patenting processes are often unclear, making it difficult for employees to know when an idea, process, or product should be patented or how they might go about doing so. These difficulties are exacerbated for women and other underrepresented patent filers who often lack access to informal networks that typically help people navigate this labyrinth.

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Multiple Factors Converge to Influence Women’s Persistence in Computing: A Qualitative Analysis

Previous research has suggested that access and exposure to computing, social supports, preparatory privilege, a sense of belonging in computing, and a computing identity all contribute to women pursuing computing as a field of study or intended career. A recent study explores what helps young women persist in computing despite the obstacles they encounter.

By the Numbers

By the Numbers

NCWIT's Women in IT: By the Numbers presents the most compelling statistics on women's participation in IT on a single page.

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Interrupting Bias in Industry Settings

Use this resource to help you practice ways to interrupt bias in real-life situations.

Use the orange button to download a printable copy of this resource and facilitation guide.

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Broadening Participation by Supporting Great Teaching

This is the first of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing. This article focuses on informal ways of encouraging student interaction as a means to building positive, inclusive student community. It also includes information on how faculty can contribute to the collection and serve as reviewers.

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Interrupting Bias in Academic Settings

Use this resource to help you practice ways to interrupt bias in real-life situations.

Use the orange button to download a printable copy of this resource and facilitation guide.

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Efforts to Make Computer Science More Inclusive of Women

This article in a special issue of ACM Inroads magazine describes recent initiatives by NCWIT, ACM-W, and Anita Borg Institute to broaden participation in computing.

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Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable: Executive Brief

In August 2016, representatives from more than 40 non-profit, industry, media, education, and policy organizations gathered for a Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable, hosted by NCWIT and Google, to discuss influence, intersectionality, and media messaging. Participants reported increased awareness about the importance of encouraging and supporting black women and girls through tangible resources and actions.

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