K-12

Girls in IT: The Facts (infographic)

This attention-getting infographic summarizes the key findings from the Girls in IT report. Use this piece to raise awareness about ways to increase girls' participation in computing.

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Stereotype Threat Cover Slide

This slide deck is a companion piece to the NCWIT Talking Point Card Talk with Faculty Colleagues About Stereotype Threat (www.ncwit.org/stereotypethreattp). You can hand out the card to your colleagues and then share these slides at a faculty meeting. 

This editor-reviewed article in the Journal for Computing Teachers, Summer 2011 Edition, provides a detailed overview of the many free, easy-to-use publications available online for educators interested in attracting more students to computing.

Girls in IT: The Facts (report)

Girls in IT: The Facts, sponsored by NCWIT's K-12 Alliance, is a synthesis of the existing literature on increasing girls’ participation in computing. It aims to bring together this latest research so that readers can gain a clearer and more coherent picture of 1) the current state of affairs for girls in computing, 2) the key barriers to increasing girls’ participation in these fields, and 3) promising practices for addressing these barriers.

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Previous research has suggested that access and exposure to computing, social supports, preparatory privilege, a sense of belonging in computing, and a computing identity all contribute to women pursuing computing as a field of study or intended career. A recent study explores what helps young women persist in computing despite the obstacles they encounter.

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This is the second of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing. This article focuses on 2016 Engagement Excellence awardees Elizabeth Boese from the University of Colorado at Boulder and Mark LeBlanc from Wheaton College (Massachusetts). They were recognized for introductory CS course materials that made use of exceptionally creative interdisciplinary connections to computing.

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Tapestry Workshop-in-a-Box contains materials for organizing professional development workshops that train high school educators in research-based, field-tested ways to attract and retain more and diverse students to computing courses. This Box includes information about the objectives and content of a Tapestry Workshop; advice on logistics and budgeting; suggestions for selecting participants and presenters; and a sample agenda, templates, and evaluation tools.

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Intel, in partnership with NCWIT, hosted Growing the Legacy of Native American Leadership in Science and Technology: A Thought Leadership Event. Key leaders in academia, government, tribal nations, non-profit organizations, and the tech industry convened to discuss the state of technology in Native American communities, identify gaps, and create actionable steps for increasing Native American student participation and retention in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education.

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In August 2016, representatives from more than 40 non-profit, industry, media, education, and policy organizations gathered for a Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable, hosted by NCWIT and Google, to discuss influence, intersectionality, and media messaging. Participants reported increased awareness about the importance of encouraging and supporting black women and girls through tangible resources and actions.

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NCWIT provides these tools in the hopes that you will find them useful as a starting point for your own evaluations. Along with survey questions, there are interview and observation protocols. Some of the survey instruments have been validated in particular settings, and others just field-tested. Ideally, you will hire a professional evaluator to work with you, but when that is not possible, you can move forward with these tools yourself.

EngageCSEdu Practices Framework Poster Preview Image

The NCWIT Engagement Practices Framework is a set of three evidence-based principles for engaging and retaining ALL students: Make It Matter, Grow Inclusive Student Community, and Build Student Confidence and Professional Identity. This poster outlines actionable things faculty can do in their classrooms and beyond to help broaden participation in computing. Display it your office or in the faculty mailroom to remind you and your colleagues of effective ways to engage all of your students.

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The NCWIT Engagement Practices Framework outlines actions faculty can take in their classrooms and beyond to help broaden participation in computing. It is organized around three evidence-based principles for engaging and retaining all students: Make It Matter, Grow Inclusive Student Community, and Build Student Confidence and Professional Identity. Within this resource, you will find tips for implementing each practice, some examples, and links to resources to learn more.

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Check out the most compelling statistics on women's participation in computing on a single page.

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Use this guide to help identify common misunderstandings that surface when people talk about how to increase the participation of women.  Learn to spot "red flags" that indicate a particular discussion is headed in a direction that may not be research-based or effective.

View online.

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A standard business card with contact info and QR code on the front, and a blank back for writing.

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Targeted recruiting means planning strategically: set quantifiable goals; identify large, capable audiences; personalize the content of your message; deliver that message in media that are relevant to your audience; and pay attention to people who influence your audience’s decision-making.

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