Higher Education

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How Do Admissions Criteria Affect Women’s Representation in Graduate Computing?

When admission committee members minimize the biasing effects of stereotypes and consider applicants’ membership in an under-represented group as a positive characteristic, they promote diversity.

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How Can REUs Help Retain Female Undergraduates?

Undergraduates with positive research experiences feel more confident and motivated to enter graduate programs. To facilitate successful REUs, supportive faculty advisors or graduate mentors should clearly communicate goals to students and allow them to spend a large amount of time on research, increasing independence as the project progresses.

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How Can Reducing Unconscious Bias Increase Women’s Success in IT?

Research shows that even individuals committed to equality harbor unconscious biases that impact everyday decisions and interactions. In the IT workplace, unconscious gender bias can mislead employers, both male and female, to make inaccurate judgments in hiring, performance reviews, and promotion.

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EngageCSEdu (website)

EngageCSEdu is a website that encourages the development of more inclusive learning environments in introductory computer science (CS) courses by helping faculty to easily share their most effective retention practices. EngageCSEdu offers thousands of projects, homework assignments, and other course materials that are searchable by computer science knowledge area, programming language, and more. All course materials are developed by faculty members nationwide and evaluated for quality by an interdisciplinary team of computer scientists, learning scientists, and diversity experts.

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How Can Encouragement Increase Persistence in Computing?

Encouragement increases self-efficacy, which is the belief in one’s ability to successfully perform a task. Because we are more likely to engage in tasks that we believe we can perform successfully, encouragement may be especially useful for attracting women to male-stereotyped fields such as computing.

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Technology and Sexuality – What's The Connection?

Technology and Sexuality – What's The Connection? Addressing Youth Sexualities in Efforts to Increase Girls' Participation in Computing

This article demonstrates the importance of paying attention to youth sexualities in efforts to increase girls’ participation in computing.  It illustrates significant ways sexuality may be thwarting our efforts to increase girls’ participation in technology and how we might improve these efforts. In addition, it highlights how we might use girls’ interest in sexuality as a potentially powerful resource for fostering their interest in computing.

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How Does Engaging Curriculum Attract Students to Computing?

Making curricula more relevant to students, introducing collaborative learning into the classroom, and tailoring courses to different student experience levels benefit female as well as male students. 

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Latinas & Tecnología de la Información

Latinas & Tecnología de la Información (website)

Latinas & Tecnología de la Información is a Spanish-language website for inspiring young Hispanic women, or Latinas, to pursue technology. The website, containing both English-language and Spanish-language resources, provides:

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A Lucrative, Secure Computing Career: Community College Can Take You There

This poster highlights the importance of community colleges to educating the computing workforce. It connects various pathways into community colleges, outlines some of key components of the community college experience, and details some of the high paying technical careers these students will be working toward. The poster was developed in collaboration with the Academic Alliance's Community College Subcommittee.

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NCWIT Tips: 8 Ways to Give Students More Effective Feedback Using a Growth Mindset

Effective feedback gives students information they actually use to increase their learning and improve their performance. It should employ a "growth mindset" that focuses on developing intelligence through effort, practice, and "wise feedback" that spurs additional effort.

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Top 10 Ways to Engage Underrepresented Students in Computing

These tips will help you to engage students in your computing courses and retain them in the major. These ideas and examples are drawn from theory and research conducted by social scientists who study issues related to diversity and retention in computing. Methods range from encouraging words to inclusive classroom environments.

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NCWIT Scorecard

NCWIT Scorecard: A Report on the Status of Women in Information Technology

The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.
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Results of a Large-Scale, Multi-Institutional Study of Undergraduate Retention in Computing

The recent upsurge in enrollments in computing means that student attrition has a substantial opportunity cost. Admitting a student who leaves both reduces graduation yield and prevents another equally qualified student from enrolling. Professors cannot change the background of students, but they can control many aspects of student experience in the computing major. This paper presents the results of a study to understand strongest predictors of retention in undergraduate computing based on a large-scale survey administered in 14 U.S.

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Bringing Young Women into Computing Through the NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Program

Article in CACM describing the obstacles girls face in entering computing and how the Aspirations program seeks to overcome those. Great overview of issues, the Aspirations program and ways individuals can get involved with the program.

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Diversity in Computing: Why It Matters and How Organizations Can Achieve It

Computing-related jobs are interesting, well-paying, secure, and abundant, so why aren't more women working in this creative field that produces the technology that is central to our daily lives?

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Resources for Change Agents

Guide to resources for attracting undergraduate women into computing and retaining them through graduation, including tools for assessing your efforts.

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Stereotypes and Stereotype Threat Affect Computing Students

This slide deck is a companion piece to the NCWIT Talking Point Card Talk with Faculty Colleagues About Stereotype Threat (www.ncwit.org/stereotypethreattp). You can hand out the card to your colleagues and then share these slides at a faculty meeting. 

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Talk with Faculty Colleagues About Stereotype Threat

This Talking Point Card explains stereotype threat and how it is triggered, shares examples of effects from stereotype threat, and suggests ways to create a stereotype threat-free environment for attracting able and diverse students to computing.


NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology

The February 2011 National Girls Collaborative Project Webinar, NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology, is archived at the NGCP website. This webcast highlights free materials and information for attracting more girls and underrepresented groups to computing and information technology and shares how formal and informal educators are using these resources to strengthen programming for girls. An archive of the webinar and the final powerpoint slides are available for viewing:


Summaries of Selected Research of SSAB Members and Visitors to 2012 NCWIT Summit

Members of the Social Science Advisory Board (SSAB) support the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) through their research and knowledge about women and information technology.  The depth and breadth of perspectives and approaches that SSAB members and visitors bring to the study of women and computing are illustrated in examples of their recent research projects.  In the research summaries that follow, we see expertise across social science fields, and theoretical and empirical issues and findings with implications for diversity and the full participation of wome