Higher Education

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Regional Celebrations-in-a-Box: Connecting Communities of Technical Women

Regional Celebrations-in-a-Box contains resources for organizing small conferences designed to increase the participation, retention, and advancement of technical women. This program-in-a-box is a compilation of materials and practices from Regional Celebrations around the country that bring women together in supportive communities for professional growth. The box includes advice about planning and materials for program elements such as intentional role modeling, group and individual mentoring, networking, and ways to share accurate career information.

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How to Create and Sustain a Women in Computing Group on Your Campus

Women's groups can help to retain students and can provide an infrastructure for local activism. This brief guide discusses how to get a group started and to build its structure, the importance of maintaining an open and public presence, possible activities, ways to build membership, and the value of affiliating with other groups.

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The Beautiful Noise of Peer Instruction: An Interview with Beth Simon

An often overlooked way to broaden participation in computing is to grow a more inclusive student community and culture. A good way to build this community is to employ well-structured collaborative learning opportunities in your courses. (Remember: "well-structured" is key!) In this EngageCSEdu Inroads column, we explore Peer Instruction, a technique with a large body of supporting research, with UCSD Professor Beth Simon.

Read more from the interview with Beth Simon here.

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Computation Creativity: An Interview with UNL’s Elizabeth Ingraham and Leen-Kiat Soh

Learn more about using Computation Creativity activities in your introductory computing courses to engage your students and to improve their learning. In this March 2018 issue of ACM Inroads magazine, NCWIT Research Scientist and EngageCSEdu Director Beth Quinn interviews Professors Liz Ingraham and Leen-Kiat Soh. Professors Ingraham and Soh, along with other colleagues from University of Nebraska, are building and testing off-line activities for developing students' creative computational thinking, or "Computational Creativity." Dr.

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NCWIT Tips: 13 Tips to Make Technical Conferences More Inclusive

Ensuring that your technical conference provides a welcome environment for a wide range of attendees is important for broadening participation in technology. Use these tips to help you create a more inclusive and welcoming conference experience for all.

View online.

T9Hacks

Saturday, February 10, 2018 (All day) to Sunday, February 11, 2018 (All day)

T9Hacks is a 24-hour hackathon held at the ATLAS Institute on Feb 10-11. All majors are encouraged to attend. No experience or expertise is required, just a desire to learn and create.

CoNECD

Sunday, April 29, 2018 (All day) to Wednesday, May 2, 2018 (All day)
The vision of the CoNECD (pronounced, “connected”) Conference is to provide a forum for exploring current research and practices to enhance diversity and inclusion of all underrepresented populations in the engineering and computing professions including gender identity and expression, race and ethnicity, disability, veterans, LGBTQ+, 1st generation and socio-economic status.
 

Where can you find NCWIT?

Sessions

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Careers With Code Magazine: August 2017 Edition

Careers with Code magazine is a guide for 14–18 year olds and anyone else interested in future careers that mix computer science with their skills, interests and passion – giving you the ability to change the world! It’s free to read online, available to order in print and updated each year.
 
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Webinar: Increase Women in Computer Science & Engineering Majors: 5 Evidence-Based Strategies (A Case Study)

This webinar was presented on May 18, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. EDT by Dr. Jennifer Goodall, an Extension Services Consultant, and Elizabeth Ensweiler, the Director of Enrollment Management at NYU Tandon School of Engineering. The webinar discussed how the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, with the help of the Extension Services program, changed their recruitment practices to significantly increase the recruitment of women Computer Science and Engineering majors.

 

NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology

The February 2011 National Girls Collaborative Project Webinar, NCWIT Resources: Inspiring Girls to Pursue Careers in Information Technology, is archived at the NGCP website. This webcast highlights free materials and information for attracting more girls and underrepresented groups to computing and information technology and shares how formal and informal educators are using these resources to strengthen programming for girls. An archive of the webinar and the final powerpoint slides are available for viewing:

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Talk with Faculty Colleagues About Stereotype Threat

This Talking Point Card explains stereotype threat and how it is triggered, shares examples of effects from stereotype threat, and suggests ways to create a stereotype threat-free environment for attracting able and diverse students to computing.

 

Summaries of Selected Research of SSAB Members and Visitors to 2012 NCWIT Summit

Members of the Social Science Advisory Board (SSAB) support the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) through their research and knowledge about women and information technology.  The depth and breadth of perspectives and approaches that SSAB members and visitors bring to the study of women and computing are illustrated in examples of their recent research projects.  In the research summaries that follow, we see expertise across social science fields, and theoretical and empirical issues and findings with implications for diversity and the full participation of wome

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Stereotypes and Stereotype Threat Affect Computing Students

This slide deck is a companion piece to the NCWIT Talking Point Card Talk with Faculty Colleagues About Stereotype Threat (www.ncwit.org/stereotypethreattp). You can hand out the card to your colleagues and then share these slides at a faculty meeting. 

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Making Interdisciplinary Connections to Engage Students

This is the second of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing. This article focuses on 2016 Engagement Excellence awardees Elizabeth Boese from the University of Colorado at Boulder and Mark LeBlanc from Wheaton College (Massachusetts). They were recognized for introductory CS course materials that made use of exceptionally creative interdisciplinary connections to computing.

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Broadening Participation by Supporting Great Teaching

This is the first of a regular column that EngageCSEdu is doing for ACM InRoads magazine. The goal of the column is that by highlighting aspects of the EngageCSEdu project and its community, we can show how great teaching can help broaden participation in computing. This article focuses on informal ways of encouraging student interaction as a means to building positive, inclusive student community. It also includes information on how faculty can contribute to the collection and serve as reviewers.

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Interrupting Bias in Academic Settings

Use this resource to help you practice ways to interrupt bias in real-life situations.

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Efforts to Make Computer Science More Inclusive of Women

This article in a special issue of ACM Inroads magazine describes recent initiatives by NCWIT, ACM-W, and Anita Borg Institute to broaden participation in computing.

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Collaborating to Grow the Pathway of Native Americans in STEM: White Paper

Intel, in partnership with NCWIT, hosted Growing the Legacy of Native American Leadership in Science and Technology: A Thought Leadership Event. Key leaders in academia, government, tribal nations, non-profit organizations, and the tech industry convened to discuss the state of technology in Native American communities, identify gaps, and create actionable steps for increasing Native American student participation and retention in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education.

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