Higher Education

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Regional Celebrations-in-a-Box contains resources for organizing small conferences designed to increase the participation, retention, and advancement of technical women. This program-in-a-box is a compilation of materials and practices from Regional Celebrations around the country that bring women together in supportive communities for professional growth. The box includes advice about planning and materials for program elements such as intentional role modeling, group and individual mentoring, networking, and ways to share accurate career information.

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Why do some women persist in computing and others don’t?

The NCWIT "Learning from Young Women" study was a longitudinal mixed methods research project that explored this question. This longitudinal study included a large sample of women from around the United States who spanned the pipeline from high school through college through workforce over a period of six years. 
 

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Let’s Talk About Gender, Race, and Identity

Use this slide deck, with its short videos (~3 min) and discussion questions, to learn about the complexity of gender, the concept of intersectionality, and how to have productive discussions about race.

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In honor of Black History Month (February 2020) and Women’s History Month (March 2020), NCWIT celebrates the contributions of Black women and girls in computing by hosting a three-part virtual chat: “The Color of Our Future: An Online Conversation Series on the Empowerment and Inclusion of Black Women & Girls in Tech.” The series explores Black girls in K-12, Black women in postsecondary computing education, and Black women in the tech workforce.

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Recruit strategically to attract a diverse range of students to your undergraduate computing program.

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Spanish version of Why Should Young People Consider Careers in Computing and Information Technology?

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What should you tell a young person about IT careers? How can they prepare now for a career in IT?

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Intersectionality is a critical and necessary concept to develop effective programs to broaden the participation of women and girls in computing. This resource provides a background and overview of the concept, in addition to key readings and resources related to women and girls of color in STEM and computing. 

 

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This self-guided course is designed for computing and information technology faculty and administrators who are beginning work on diversifying undergraduate computing programs or are trying to reignite existing initiatives. 

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Mentoring programs are an excellent way to support graduate students’ sense of belonging in the local intellectual community and help them move forward in their professional careers. Everyone benefits from mentoring, including the mentors themselves, especially when both mentors and mentees are fully committed to the relationship.

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Achieving equity in the tech industry must be intersectional: race, class, gender, sexuality, and other key factors of identity shape experiences differently; and understanding those differences is critical to promoting diversity, inclusion, and change for women, girls, and other underrepresented groups in IT.

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This Guide was created to support the use of evidence-based interventions by change leaders. It can help researchers to avoid jargon and communicate effectively. This resource is intended to help readers design an overall communication strategy. Steps include identifying goals and philosophy, deciding whether to translate at all, carefully analyzing specific audiences, and based on these, developing a user-centered communication strategy.

Modern Figures Podcast

Modern Figures Podcast (http://modernfigurespodcast.com/) guest stars Black women in computing who share their stories and perspectives on technical, societal, and personal topics. Geared toward women of color in STEM, especially high school and college students, the podcast also highlights the interestingly relatable, pivotal moments along their journey in computing. 

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The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.

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Advancing K-16 computing education in a state is a complex and collaborative endeavor. Computing education state summits are an important part of this process and can help to develop and advance a state’s strategy both for expanding computing education access and for broadening participation in computing (BPC). In particular, summits can promote equity and democratize change efforts by giving voice to all stakeholders in a collaborative and action-oriented environment.
 
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Women in Computing (WIC) groups on college and university campuses can help reduce feelings of isolation and increase a sense of community and belonging. They can also be places where members can discuss difficulties they encounter and strategies for addressing these challenges in the larger community. But sometimes, women’s groups can also produce unintended consequences (e.g. convey the idea that women are a homogenous group or need "extra help"). Use the following tips to avoid these pitfalls and to ensure the success of your WIC group.

Monday, October 8, 2018 (All day) to Thursday, October 11, 2018 (All day)

Inadequate computing education shortchanges all kids, but especially girls and youth of color. Right now, just 34 states and the District of Columbia allow computer science to count as a math or science graduation requirement (“Girls in IT: The Facts” report). Yet, the U.S. Department of Labor expects 3.5 million computing-related job openings by 2026, and at the current rate, only 17 percent of these jobs could be filled by U.S.

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An often overlooked way to broaden participation in computing is to grow a more inclusive student community and culture. A good way to build this community is to employ well-structured collaborative learning opportunities in your courses. (Remember: "well-structured" is key!) In this EngageCSEdu Inroads column, we explore Peer Instruction, a technique with a large body of supporting research, with UCSD Professor Beth Simon.

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Learn more about using Computation Creativity activities in your introductory computing courses to engage your students and to improve their learning. In this March 2018 issue of ACM Inroads magazine, NCWIT Research Scientist and EngageCSEdu Director Beth Quinn interviews Professors Liz Ingraham and Leen-Kiat Soh. Professors Ingraham and Soh, along with other colleagues from University of Nebraska, are building and testing off-line activities for developing students' creative computational thinking, or "Computational Creativity." Dr.

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Ensuring that your technical conference provides a welcome environment for a wide range of attendees is important for broadening participation in technology. Use these tips to help you create a more inclusive and welcoming conference experience for all.

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