Resources

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How to Create and Sustain a Women in Computing Group on Your Campus

Women's groups can help to retain students and can provide an infrastructure for local activism. This brief guide discusses how to get a group started and to build its structure, the importance of maintaining an open and public presence, possible activities, ways to build membership, and the value of affiliating with other groups.

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Top 10 Ways of Recruiting High School Women into Your Computing Classes

Recruiting diverse students to computing requires that you spark their interest, build their confidence they can succeed, create a community where they feel like they belong, and help them see themselves as a "computing person". This Top 10 list offers practices that help you recruit high school girls to your computing courses.

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NCWIT AspireIT: Grant Recipient

NCWIT AspireIT: Grant Recipient (Online Badge)

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NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award: Recipient

NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award: Recipient (Online Badge)

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NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing: Award Recipient

NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing: Award Recipient (Online Badge)

Display the "NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing: Award Recipient" badge at your site.

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Diversity in Computing: Why It Matters and How Organizations Can Achieve It

Computing-related jobs are interesting, well-paying, secure, and abundant, so why aren't more women working in this creative field that produces the technology that is central to our daily lives?

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How Can Encouragement Increase Persistence in Computing?

Encouragement increases self-efficacy, which is the belief in one’s ability to successfully perform a task. Because we are more likely to engage in tasks that we believe we can perform successfully, encouragement may be especially useful for attracting women to male-stereotyped fields such as computing.

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AgentCubes-in-a-Box: Introduce Computing Through Game Design

Introduce students to computer science through AgentCubes, a powerful and engaging 2-D and 3-D programming tool. By completing the lessons in this program-in-a-box your middle school students will learn to program their own games and simulation worlds, and in the process learn the fundamentals of computer science.

Top 10 Ways to Thrive in Your Technical Career

Top 10 Ways to Thrive in Your Technical Career

This resource provides tips mid-career technical women can use to advance their careers.

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Girls in IT: The Facts (infographic)

Girls in IT: The Facts Infographic

This attention-getting infographic summarizes the key findings from the Girls in IT report. Use this piece to raise awareness about ways to increase girls' participation in computing.

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How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way?

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects.

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Top 5 Reasons You Should Work at a Startup

Top 5 Reasons You Should Work at a Startup

Listing the top five reasons to work at a startup, this card encourages computing professionals to consider jobs with members of the NCWIT Entrepreneurial Alliance. 

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Summaries of Selected Research of SSAB Members and Visitors to 2012 NCWIT Summit

Members of the Social Science Advisory Board (SSAB) support the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) through their research and knowledge about women and information technology.  The depth and breadth of perspectives and approaches that SSAB members and visitors bring to the study of women and computing are illustrated in examples of their recent research projects.  In the research summaries that follow, we see expertise across social science fields, and theoretical and empirical issues and findings with implications for diversity and the full participation of wome

Assessing Girls’ Interest, Confidence, and Participation in Computing Activities: Results for Globaloria in West Virginia

This report examines the effects of participation in Globaloria on girls' interests, confidence, and participation in computing activities by analyzing pre- and post- test data for Globaloria participants and enrollment data for Globaloria elective courses. Results demonstrate that outcomes of Globaloria participation among girls include an increase in several home computing activities for girls, and that total female enrollment in elective Globaloria courses is higher than the national average for female enrollment in computing courses.

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Who Invents IT? Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, 2012 Update

The original 2007 report, Who Invents IT? An Analysis of Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, examined the rates at which women have been patenting in information technology (IT), how these rates have evolved between 1980-2005, and how these rates differ across IT industry sub-categories and across specific organizations. This edition updates the previous report, exploring these trends from 2006-2010.

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