Community College

RCWiC Box Cover

Regional Celebrations-in-a-Box: Connecting Communities of Technical Women

Regional Celebrations-in-a-Box contains resources for organizing small conferences designed to increase the participation, retention, and advancement of technical women. This program-in-a-box is a compilation of materials and practices from Regional Celebrations around the country that bring women together in supportive communities for professional growth. The box includes advice about planning and materials for program elements such as intentional role modeling, group and individual mentoring, networking, and ways to share accurate career information.

Preview Image

Organize: Broadening Participation in Computing State Summit Toolkit

Advancing K-16 computing education in a state is a complex and collaborative endeavor. Computing education state summits are an important part of this process and can help to develop and advance a state’s strategy both for expanding computing education access and for broadening participation in computing (BPC). In particular, summits can promote equity and democratize change efforts by giving voice to all stakeholders in a collaborative and action-oriented environment.
 
Preview Image

NCWIT Tips: 13 Tips for Creating and Sustaining a Women in Computing Group on Your Campus

Women in Computing (WIC) groups on college and university campuses can help reduce feelings of isolation and increase a sense of community and belonging. They can also be places where members can discuss difficulties they encounter and strategies for addressing these challenges in the larger community. But sometimes, women’s groups can also produce unintended consequences (e.g. convey the idea that women are a homogenous group or need "extra help"). Use the following tips to avoid these pitfalls and to ensure the success of your WIC group.

Stereotype Threat Cover Image

Talk with Faculty Colleagues About Stereotype Threat

This Talking Point Card explains stereotype threat and how it is triggered, shares examples of effects from stereotype threat, and suggests ways to create a stereotype threat-free environment for attracting able and diverse students to computing.

Preview Image

Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable: Executive Brief

In August 2016, representatives from more than 40 non-profit, industry, media, education, and policy organizations gathered for a Black Women and Girls in Computing Roundtable, hosted by NCWIT and Google, to discuss influence, intersectionality, and media messaging. Participants reported increased awareness about the importance of encouraging and supporting black women and girls through tangible resources and actions.

Preview Image

Male Allies and Advocates:* Helping Create Inclusive & Highly Productive Technology Workplaces

Preview Image

EngageCSEdu Poster 2016 (11"x17")

Related resource:
  • EngageCSEdu: Foster diversity in your introductory computer science courses with quality content and engaging pedagogy.
Preview Image

Counselors for Computing (C4C) Business Card (standard)

A standard business card with contact info and QR code on the front, and a blank back for writing.

How Can You Re-Engineer Your Undergraduate Program to Increase Women's Representation in Computing? Small Steps Toward Systemic Change (Case Study 1)

How Can You Re-Engineer Your Undergraduate Program to Increase Women’s Representation in Computing?

The socio-educational system a student experiences shapes participation in the major. Altering one element of that system is often not enough to create enduring change. When faculty members are ready to implement organizational innovation, success is more likely if they receive support from institutional leaders, have access to adequate resources, and are able to participate in decision-making about the change.

Thumbnail Image

Women in Tech: The Facts (2016 Update)

One of NCWIT’s most popular reports has been updated for 2016. See what’s changed and what hasn’t. Women in Tech: The Facts brings together the latest findings from recent research on technical women including the current state of affairs for technical women, a summary of the key barriers to women's participation in technology, promising practices for addressing these barriers, and tools to support your organization's change efforts.

 

NCWIT Resources for Community Colleges

The NCWIT Academic Alliance Community College Involvement Team has selected the resources below as particularly relevant to the community college context.

Preview Image

How Does the Physical Environment Affect Women’s Entry and Persistence in Computing?

The décor of physical spaces conveys messages about the kinds of people who belong there and the kinds of activities that should be done there. Understanding this influence allows us to actively craft an environment that makes a broad range of people feel welcome in computing.

View the research

Thumbnail Image

How Do You Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy?

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students.

View the research

Preview Image

Los 10 mejores consejos para que la familia logre que las niñas se interesen en la computación

La tecnología es un campo de rápido crecimiento, con salarios altos y creativo. He aquí 10 consejos para que usted, como miembro de la familia, pueda estimular a las niñas a su alrededor a estudiar y a hacer una carrera profesional en ciencias informáticas y tecnología relacionada.

Ver En Inglés

Preview Image

NCWIT Tips: 7 Tips for Conducting Inclusive Faculty Searches

Subtle barriers might be preventing you from hiring the best available candidates. These tips will help you conduct inclusive searches that appeal to women and people from other underrepresented groups.

View online.

Preview Image

Top 10 Ways Families Can Encourage Girls' Interest in Computing

Technology is a fast-growing, high-paying, creative field. Here are 10 ways that you, as a family member, can encourage the girls in your life to study, and have a career in, computer science and related technology fields.

View Online

Preview Image

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way?

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects.

View the research

Preview Image

Computing: Get the Most Out of Your College Degree

Computing offers high quality jobs and is one of the fastest growing occupations in the United States. This resource compares computing to other occupations on quality of life issues such as pay, educational requirements, and work hours, to assist young women and their advisors in deciding whether computing is right for them.

Preview Image

How Do Stereotype Threats Affect Retention?

Stereotype threat harms both performance and motivation by reducing our feelings of competence, belonging, and trust in our colleagues. However, careful thought, education, and regular assessment of diversity practices can help minimize incidents of stereotype threat.

View the research

EngageCSEdu

EngageCSEdu (website)

EngageCSEdu is a website that encourages the development of more inclusive learning environments in introductory computer science (CS) courses by helping faculty to easily share their most effective retention practices. EngageCSEdu offers thousands of projects, homework assignments, and other course materials that are searchable by computer science knowledge area, programming language, and more. All course materials are developed by faculty members nationwide and evaluated for quality by an interdisciplinary team of computer scientists, learning scientists, and diversity experts.

Pages