Academic / Research

Ed Jobs Map

Computing Education and Future Jobs: A Look at National, State & Congressional District Data

This report includes data about IT jobs and computer science education, disaggregated by state and congressional district.

Or, use the interactive map to look at education and jobs in your area.

Gender and Computing Conference Papers

More than 40 years of data on authors of ACM conference papers describe women’s contribution to this important aspect of computing professional life. The data show that women’s authorship increased substantially over time, and that relative to their representation in the likely pool of ACM conference paper authors, women Ph.D.s were especially productive. Initial tests indicate that the increase in women’s share of papers was due in large part to the increase in number of women in the community of potential authors.

Information Technology: How the power of IT and the power of women will power the future

Information Technology: How the power of IT and the power of women will power the future

A report on the importance of IT to our future, and why women's participation matters.

Communicating for Change: Persuade Colleagues to Get on Board

Communicating for Change: Persuade Colleagues to Get on Board

Changing the culture of an organization to one that promotes women’s participation in computing requires that members reach new understandings and act in new ways. Enlisting allies in this process requires persuasive communication. This resource provides guidance on the four distinct and necessary steps for the long-term process of effective persuasion. For more information on the Extension Services program, visit https://www.ncwit.org/project/extension-services-undergraduate-programs.

Evaluating a Mentoring Program Guide

Evaluating a Mentoring Program Guide

Need help evaluating your mentoring program? This resource provides a step-by-step plan with example metrics for evaluating a workplace mentoring program (in either industry or academia). Recommendations are based on best practices in professional program evaluation. This guide can be used as a companion resource to NCWIT's Mentoring-in-a-Box: Technical Women at Work available at www.ncwit.org/imentor and NCWIT's Mentoring-in-a-Box: Women Faculty in Computing at www.ncwit.org/facultymentor.

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Supervisors as Change Agents

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Supervisors as Change Agents

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Supervisors as Change Agents is for supervisors who wish to become change agents in their organizations. The materials are focused on actions that you as an individual supervisor can take to raise awareness and motivate change. Of course, supervisors cannot “do it all,” but these individual efforts are often what it takes to spark change. The materials here also point to other NCWIT resources that can help with planning more systemic, department, or company-wide change at later stages.

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Performance Review/Talent Management

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Performance Review/Talent Management

Supervising-in-a-Box: Performance Review/Talent Management provides supervisors with resources for reducing biases in performance evaluation and talent management systems. This “Box” includes tip sheets, resources for identifying and reducing biases, templates, evaluation tools, key takeaways, and background information on unconscious biases.

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Team/Project Management

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Team/Project Management

Supervising-in-a-Box helps establish supportive and effective relationships with a diverse range of employees. This box explores ways to reduce or remove unconscious bias, discriminatory practices, and institutional barriers while performing supervisory job functions – including recruitment, project management, performance evaluations, feedback processes, and everyday communication. Team/Project Management focuses on running an effective, innovative, and productive team.

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Employee Development

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Employee Development

Supervising-in-a-Box Series helps establish supportive and effective relationships with a diverse range of employees. This box explores ways to reduce or remove unconscious bias, discriminatory practices, and institutional barriers while performing supervisory job functions – including recruitment, project management, performance evaluations, feedback processes, and everyday communication. Employee Development focuses on ensuring that employees contribute their best ideas and talents to the team.

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Employee Recruitment/Selection

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Employee Recruitment/Selection

Supervising-in-a-Box: Employee Recruitment/Selection provides supervisors with resources for recruiting and hiring the best talent. This “Box” includes background information, a training guide, tip sheets, resources for employee recruitment and selection, templates, evaluation tools, and a summary of key takeaways.

International Women's Day-in-a-Box

International Women's Day-in-a-Box: Raising Awareness, Igniting Change

International Women's Day-in-a-Box: Raising Awareness, Igniting Change is designed to help IT companies and departments celebrate successes and address barriers to women's full participation in IT, and capitalize on women's innovative thinking and leadership potential. If your organization is eager to promote diversity in order to become globally competitive, then International Women's Day-in-a-Box is for you. Use this resource to plan company activities and events, and to establish a culture and expectation for broader diversity of thought in IT.

Mentoring-in-a-Box: Technical Women at Work

Mentoring-in-a-Box: Technical Women at Work

Technical women face challenges, from institutionalized bias to differences in communication styles to a lack of female role models. Developed in collaboration with the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology, Mentoring-in-a-Box: Technical Women at Work helps women excel in the technical professions and advance to positions of leadership.

 

Talking Points

Institutional Barriers & Their Effects: How can I talk to colleagues about these issues?

Institutional barriers (IBs) are policies, procedures, or situations that systematically disadvantage certain groups of people. IBs exist in any majority-minority group situation. When an initial population is fairly similar (e.g., in male-dominated professions), systems naturally emerge to meet the needs of this population. If these systems do not change with the times, they can inhibit the success of new members with different needs. IBs often seem natural or “just the way things are around here.”

Women in IT: The Facts

Women in IT: The Facts

Women in IT: The Facts, sponsored by NCWIT's Workforce Alliance, brings together the latest findings from recent research on technical women. This report gives you:

  • The best available data about the current state of affairs for technical women, in a single, easy-to-access resource
  • A summary of the key barriers to women's participation in technology AND promising practices for addressing these barriers
  • Data and tools to support your organization's change efforts
Strategic Planning for Increasing Women’s Participation in the Computing Industry

Strategic Planning for Increasing Women’s Participation in the Computing Industry

This workbook presents guidelines for strategic planning to reach gender parity in technology companies or departments. Key components include: A Blueprint for Sustained Increases in Women’s Participation; Create Your Strategic Plan Using the NCWIT IT Industry Reform Model; Lay the Foundation with Top Leadership Support, Institutional Accountability, and Supervisory Relationships; Build the Ecosystem; Evaluation.

Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women Guide

Resources for Retaining and Advancing Mid-career Technical Women Guide

Managers and others can use this guide to find NCWIT resources that will help them create highly-productive, diverse technical teams. Resources are catalogued by the key “change areas” identified in the NCWIT Change Model for Industry: 1) Top Leadership Support, 2) Supervisory Relationships, 3) Recruitment and Selection, 4) Talent Development and Mentoring, 5) Performance Evaluation and Promotion, 6) Support for Competing Responsibilities, 7) Reduction of Subtle Biases, and 8) Ongoing Evaluation.  Space also exists for adding company-specific resources into the guide.

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