Resources

Whether you’re in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K–12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

 

NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing Application Poster

The NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing (AiC) honors 9th-12th grade students who self-identify as women, genderqueer, or non-binary for their computing-related achievements and interests, and encourages them to pursue their passions. Use this poster to spread the word! Find out more at www.aspirations.org.

 

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Inspired by teachers creating Bitmoji virtual classrooms, NCWIT has assembled a set of interactive elements to help teachers make all students feel welcome and to maintain and enhance their interest in computing. By adding the elements to their own virtual classrooms, teachers can maintain a positive classroom climate, show students “possible selves” in computing, maintain student interest, and show them career and other opportunities (including NCWIT opportunities, of course).

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Why do some women persist in computing and others don’t?

The NCWIT "Learning from Young Women" study was a longitudinal mixed methods research project that explored this question. This longitudinal study included a large sample of women from around the United States who spanned the pipeline from high school through college through workforce over a period of six years. 
 

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Let’s Talk About Gender, Race, and Identity

Use this slide deck, with its short videos (~3 min) and discussion questions, to learn about the complexity of gender, the concept of intersectionality, and how to have productive discussions about race.

"Tech Culture Interrupted" is an engaging and provocative conversation between NCWIT social scientists (Dr. Catherine Ashcraft and Dr. Brad McLain) and a variety of special guests from the tech industry’s top leaders and innovators. The podcast explores ground-breaking research and ground-truth stories about how to build more inclusive and more innovative workplace cultures through new perspectives on leadership, community, and engagement.

In its inaugural episode, Catherine and Brad sit down with Kim Vorrath, Vice President of OS Programs, Apple.

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Check out the most compelling statistics on women's participation in computing on a single page.

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In honor of Black History Month (February 2020) and Women’s History Month (March 2020), NCWIT celebrates the contributions of Black women and girls in computing by hosting a three-part virtual chat: “The Color of Our Future: An Online Conversation Series on the Empowerment and Inclusion of Black Women & Girls in Tech.” The series explores Black girls in K-12, Black women in postsecondary computing education, and Black women in the tech workforce.

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The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.

Which computing pathway is right for me?

This resource, co-branded by the six founding PACE (Partnership for Advancing Computing Education) organizations, explains how computing interests and talents line up with different undergraduate courses of study and the careers that follow.

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Recruit strategically to attract a diverse range of students to your undergraduate computing program.

Moving Beyond Computer Literacy: Why schools should teach computer science
Computer Science (CS) — not computer literacy — underlies most innovation today, from biotechnology to geoscience to national security. Computer science teaches students design, logical reasoning, and problem solving — all valuable well beyond the computer science classroom. This resource provides information about the value of computer science curriculum for students, educators, local and national economies as well as global society. It offers steps schools can take to successfully incorporate computer science education.
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Spanish version of Why Should Young People Consider Careers in Computing and Information Technology?

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What should you tell a young person about IT careers? How can they prepare now for a career in IT?

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This self-guided course is designed for computing and information technology faculty and administrators who are beginning work on diversifying undergraduate computing programs or are trying to reignite existing initiatives. 

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Intersectionality is a critical and necessary concept to develop effective programs to broaden the participation of women and girls in computing. This resource provides a background and overview of the concept, in addition to key readings and resources related to women and girls of color in STEM and computing. 

 

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