K-12 Alliance Members

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CSforAll Consortium

The CSforAll Consortium is a hub for the national Computer Science for All movement that works to enable all students in grades K-12 to achieve computer science literacy as an integral part of their educational experience.

With deep cross-functional expertise in CS education, the Consortium is led by CSNYC with advisement from a steering committee that comprises the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM), the College Board, the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA), and the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT).

The Consortium sets a collective agenda together with our membership of more than 340 content providers, education associations, researchers, and supporters to help schools and districts provide all students with rigorous K-12 computer science education. We serve as a platform for connecting diverse stakeholders, providing support to new and developing initiatives, tracking and sharing progress, and communicating about the work to local and national audiences.

 

  • Jumee Song

Curriki

Curriki, a 2016 SIIA CODiE Award finalist, hosts a free library of 83,000+ educator-vetted learning materials in all K-12 subject areas and in many formats—from individual lesson plans, instructional videos and units, to games and simulations. All content contributed by educators and select partners is available to others for use, adapt and share at no cost. In addition, Curriki curates resources into course-sequenced, standards-aligned units to enable educators to easily find materials. 



The mission of Curriki, a nonprofit organization, is to eliminate the gap between those who have access to high-quality education and those who do not. Its online community of educators, learners and committed education experts works together to create quality materials that benefit teachers, parents and students globally. 

  • Janet Pinto
Cybersecurity Competition Federation

Cybersecurity Competition Federation

The Cybersecurity Competition Federation, also known as the Federation or CyberFed (NSF Award DUE- 134536), is an association of academic, industry and government organizations with a common interest in supporting cybersecurity competitions and the competitors they serve. Federation members share the common goal of increasing awareness, endorsing ethical standards, building a common understanding of diverse competition tasks, helping those who oversee activities and competitions, and ensuring a developmental pathway of cybersecurity-based activities that support the growth of cybersecurity skill. With a focus on communication and promotion the Federation supports an engaged and thriving ecosystem of cybersecurity competitions and related activities which in turn will rapidly prepare people with widely needed cybersecurity knowledge and skills.

  • Daniel Manson
Dot Diva logo

Dot Diva

The Dot Diva / New Image for Computing (NIC) initiative is sponsored by WGBH. Dot Diva's mission is to create an exciting and positive image of computing for high school girls. Their nationwide survey revealed that not only do the majority of girls think of computing as "boring" and "hard," but they believe it fails to deliver two crucial benefits: "working with others" and "making a difference in other people's lives." Their ultimate goal is to transform this negative perception.

  • Mary Haggerty

Electronic Arts

Electronic Arts Inc. ("EA") is a leading global interactive entertainment software company. EA delivers games, content and online services for Internet-connected consoles, personal computers, mobile phones and tablets.

  • Joy Pena

ETR

Education, Training, Research (ETR) is a non-profit organization in California with a multidisciplinary staff of educators, trainers, program developers, publication and distribution experts, and social scientists. Our primary focus areas are Diversity in IT and Sexual and Reproductive Health. We generate original research and do research syntheses and translations to inform efforts to increase diversity and learning in K-12, higher education, and the tech workforce. We also build research and evaluation partnerships with schools, community-based programs, colleges, and tech companies to build their capacity to recruit and retain underrepresented populations, and to increase their impact.

  • Jill Denner, PhD

Expanding Computing Education Pathways

The Expanding Computing Education Pathways (ECEP) Alliance builds on five years of work by the Commonwealth Alliance for IT Education (CAITE) and Georgia Computes! and on best practices in computing education, particularly those developed in the community of Broadening Participation in Computing (BPC) Alliances. ECEP is an alliance of 12 US states and territories. The goal of ECEP is to have a significant impact on improving and broadening participation in K -12 computing education state by state. Increasing the number of computing and computing-intensive degree graduates, and the diversity of those graduates, requires systemic change to educational pathways. Underrepresented minority students may not gain access to quality computing education unless it is made available broadly in high schools.

For computing to be taken seriously in middle, high school and community and 4-year colleges requires that we define high school computing curricula, increase the number of well-trained, certified high school computing teachers, improve post-secondary degree programs, curricular alignment, advising, and retention, and generally promote K-20 computing education reform. ECEP state partners and regions should see significant improvements in their computing education, through public policy, outreach, or changes in the education system.

  • Sarah T. Dunton

Exploring Computer Science, UCLA & University of Oregon

Exploring Computer Science (ECS) is a comprehensive, year-long introductory high school course created in 2008 to increase opportunities for girls and students of color to learn computer science. Developed with NSF support from the “Broadening Participation in Computing” program, the ECS program provides schools with an inquiry-based, culturally-responsive curriculum and an accompanying teacher professional development program. ECS has grown into a nationwide program and is currently offered across multiple states and in the largest school districts in the nation. This course was developed in response to scholarship outlined in Stuck in the Shallow End, and ECS classrooms serve as an important site for ECS researchers to investigate the educational ecosystem necessary for supporting learners in computer science classrooms, especially in underserved schools and communities.

FIRST

FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization founded in 1989 by inventor/entrepreneur Dean Kamen to inspire young people's interest and participation in science and technology.  Student participants, in K-12, master skills and concepts to aid in learning science and technology through innovative projects and robotics competitions, while gaining valuable employment and life skills. 

  • Carla Proulx
Games for Learning Institute (G4LI)

Games for Learning Institute (G4LI)

The Games for Learning Institute (G4LI) seeks to answer critical questions, pointing the way to a new era of game use in education. The Institute was established in 2008 with a prestigious grant from Microsoft Research, and supplemental funding from the Motorola Foundation. Based at New York University, the Institute brings together 14 game designers, computer scientists, and education researchers from 9 partner institutions. G4LI applies a scientifically rigorous approach that uses both quantitative and qualitative methods. Researchers study existing games, identify key design elements and learning patterns, develop prototype "mini games" based on these elements and patterns, test them in classroom and informal learning settings, and evaluate the results. G4LI's initial focus is on digital games as tools for teaching science, technology, engineering, and math - STEM subjects - at the critical middle-school level.

  • Susan Stratton

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