K-12 Alliance Members

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Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA)

The Boys & Girls Clubs of America's mission is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens.  A Boys & Girls Club provides: a safe place to learn and grow, ongoing relationships with caring, adult professionals, life-enhancing programs and character development experiences and hope and opportunity.

  • Danielle Johnson

Code.org

Code.org is a non-profit dedicated to growing computer programming education.  Our vision is that every student in every school should have the opportunity to learn computer science.  We believe computer science should be part of the core curriculum in education, alongside other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses, such as biology, physics, chemistry and algebra.

College Board

College Board

The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. The College Board serves students and their parents, high schools, and colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. The College Board is committed to equity, and achieves this through various studies of its tests, such as a longitudinal test comparing SAT-Verbal scores of men and women.

  • Lien Diaz

Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA)

The Computer Science Teachers Association is a membership organization that supports and promotes the teaching of computer science and other computing disciplines. CSTA provides opportunities for K-12 teachers and students to better understand the computing disciplines and to more successfully prepare themselves to teach and learn. This association is dedicated to improving the equity of the work done in the organization. This association is achieving this through creating opportunities for underrepresented groups, such as girls, to make computer science education more equitable.

  • Lissa Clayborn,
CoSN Logo

CoSN

CoSN (the Consortium for School Networking) is the premier professional association for district technology leaders. For over two decades, CoSN has provided leaders with the management, community building, and advocacy tools they need to succeed. Today, CoSN represents over 10 million students in school districts nationwide and continues to grow as a powerful and influential voice in K-12 education. 

  • Jean Tower
Cybersecurity Competition Federation

Cybersecurity Competition Federation

The Cybersecurity Competition Federation, also known as the Federation or CyberFed (NSF Award DUE- 134536), is an association of academic, industry and government organizations with a common interest in supporting cybersecurity competitions and the competitors they serve. Federation members share the common goal of increasing awareness, endorsing ethical standards, building a common understanding of diverse competition tasks, helping those who oversee activities and competitions, and ensuring a developmental pathway of cybersecurity-based activities that support the growth of cybersecurity skill. With a focus on communication and promotion the Federation supports an engaged and thriving ecosystem of cybersecurity competitions and related activities which in turn will rapidly prepare people with widely needed cybersecurity knowledge and skills.

  • Daniel Manson
Dot Diva logo

Dot Diva

The Dot Diva / New Image for Computing (NIC) initiative is sponsored by WGBH. Dot Diva's mission is to create an exciting and positive image of computing for high school girls. Their nationwide survey revealed that not only do the majority of girls think of computing as "boring" and "hard," but they believe it fails to deliver two crucial benefits: "working with others" and "making a difference in other people's lives." Their ultimate goal is to transform this negative perception.

  • Mary Haggerty

ETR

Education, Training, Research (ETR) is a non-profit organization in California with a multidisciplinary staff of educators, trainers, program developers, publication and distribution experts, and social scientists. Our primary focus areas are Diversity in IT and Sexual and Reproductive Health. We generate original research and do research syntheses and translations to inform efforts to increase diversity and learning in K-12, higher education, and the tech workforce. We also build research and evaluation partnerships with schools, community-based programs, colleges, and tech companies to build their capacity to recruit and retain underrepresented populations, and to increase their impact.

  • Jill Denner, PhD

Expanding Computing Education Pathways

The Expanding Computing Education Pathways (ECEP) Alliance builds on five years of work by the Commonwealth Alliance for IT Education (CAITE) and Georgia Computes! and on best practices in computing education, particularly those developed in the community of Broadening Participation in Computing (BPC) Alliances. ECEP is an alliance of 12 US states and territories. The goal of ECEP is to have a significant impact on improving and broadening participation in K -12 computing education state by state. Increasing the number of computing and computing-intensive degree graduates, and the diversity of those graduates, requires systemic change to educational pathways. Underrepresented minority students may not gain access to quality computing education unless it is made available broadly in high schools.

For computing to be taken seriously in middle, high school and community and 4-year colleges requires that we define high school computing curricula, increase the number of well-trained, certified high school computing teachers, improve post-secondary degree programs, curricular alignment, advising, and retention, and generally promote K-20 computing education reform. ECEP state partners and regions should see significant improvements in their computing education, through public policy, outreach, or changes in the education system.

  • Sarah T. Dunton

Exploring Computer Science, UCLA & University of Oregon

Exploring Computer Science (ECS) is a comprehensive, year-long introductory high school course created in 2008 to increase opportunities for girls and students of color to learn computer science. Developed with NSF support from the “Broadening Participation in Computing” program, the ECS program provides schools with an inquiry-based, culturally-responsive curriculum and an accompanying teacher professional development program. ECS has grown into a nationwide program and is currently offered across multiple states and in the largest school districts in the nation. This course was developed in response to scholarship outlined in Stuck in the Shallow End, and ECS classrooms serve as an important site for ECS researchers to investigate the educational ecosystem necessary for supporting learners in computer science classrooms, especially in underserved schools and communities.

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