K-12 Alliance Members

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Electronic Arts - EA

Electronic Arts Inc. ("EA") is a leading global interactive entertainment software company. EA delivers games, content and online services for Internet-connected consoles, personal computers, mobile phones and tablets.

  • Julie Wynn

ETR

Education, Training, Research (ETR) is a non-profit organization in California with a multidisciplinary staff of educators, trainers, program developers, publication and distribution experts, and social scientists. Our primary focus areas are Diversity in IT and Sexual and Reproductive Health. We generate original research and do research syntheses and translations to inform efforts to increase diversity and learning in K-12, higher education, and the tech workforce. We also build research and evaluation partnerships with schools, community-based programs, colleges, and tech companies to build their capacity to recruit and retain underrepresented populations, and to increase their impact.

  • Jill Denner, PhD

Expanding Computing Education Pathways

The Expanding Computing Education Pathways (ECEP) Alliance builds on five years of work by the Commonwealth Alliance for IT Education (CAITE) and Georgia Computes! and on best practices in computing education, particularly those developed in the community of Broadening Participation in Computing (BPC) Alliances. ECEP is an alliance of 12 US states and territories. The goal of ECEP is to have a significant impact on improving and broadening participation in K -12 computing education state by state. Increasing the number of computing and computing-intensive degree graduates, and the diversity of those graduates, requires systemic change to educational pathways. Underrepresented minority students may not gain access to quality computing education unless it is made available broadly in high schools.

For computing to be taken seriously in middle, high school and community and 4-year colleges requires that we define high school computing curricula, increase the number of well-trained, certified high school computing teachers, improve post-secondary degree programs, curricular alignment, advising, and retention, and generally promote K-20 computing education reform. ECEP state partners and regions should see significant improvements in their computing education, through public policy, outreach, or changes in the education system.

  • Sarah T. Dunton

Exploring Computer Science, UCLA & University of Oregon

Exploring Computer Science (ECS) is a comprehensive, year-long introductory high school course created in 2008 to increase opportunities for girls and students of color to learn computer science. Developed with NSF support from the “Broadening Participation in Computing” program, the ECS program provides schools with an inquiry-based, culturally-responsive curriculum and an accompanying teacher professional development program. ECS has grown into a nationwide program and is currently offered across multiple states and in the largest school districts in the nation. This course was developed in response to scholarship outlined in Stuck in the Shallow End, and ECS classrooms serve as an important site for ECS researchers to investigate the educational ecosystem necessary for supporting learners in computer science classrooms, especially in underserved schools and communities.