Resources

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Top 10 Ways to Hire the Best for Your Computing Start-up

This Top 10 resource offers recommendations for attracting and hiring highly qualified diverse technical employees into start-up companies. The recommendations include attention to casting a wide inclusive net, stereotyped language and decor, as well as some more cutting-edge approaches.

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How Does Engaging Curriculum Attract Students to Computing? Harvey Mudd College's Successful Systemic Approach (Case Study 2)

How Does Engaging Curriculum Attract Students to Computing? Harvey Mudd College's Successful Systemic Approach (Case Study 2)

Making curricula more relevant to students, introducing collaborative learning into the classroom, and tailoring courses to different student experience levels benefit female as well as male students. This case study focuses on the successful pre- and early-computing major redesign carried out at Harvey Mudd College. Student performance has held steady while skyrocketing women’s representation from consistently less than 20% all the way to 50% of the incoming computer science majors.

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How to Create and Sustain a Women in Computing Group on Your Campus

Women's groups can help to retain students and can provide an infrastructure for local activism. This brief guide discusses how to get a group started and to build its structure, the importance of maintaining an open and public presence, possible activities, ways to build membership, and the value of affiliating with other groups.

How Can REUs Help Retain Female Undergraduates? Faculty Perspectives (Case Study 1)

How Can REUs Help Retain Female Undergraduates? Faculty Perspectives (Case Study 1)

Undergraduates with positive research experiences feel more confident and motivated to enter graduate programs. To facilitate successful REUs, supportive faculty advisors or graduate mentors should clearly communicate goals to students and allow them to spend a large amount of time on research, increasing independence as the project progresses. Professors Scott McCrickard of Virginia Tech University and Margaret Burnett of Oregon State University treat their undergraduate researchers as members of their respective research teams.

Computer Science-in-a-Box

Computer Science-in-a-Box: Unplug Your Curriculum

Computer Science-in-a-Box: Unplug Your Curriculum introduces fundamental building blocks of computer science -- without using computers. Use it with students ages 9 to 14 to teach lessons about how computers work, while addressing critical mathematics and science concepts such as number systems, algorithms, and manipulating variables and logic. NCWIT is pleased to offer Computer Science-in-a-Box: Unplug Your Curriculum in cooperation with the authors of Computer Science Unplugged. So unplug your computer, and get ready to explore computer science!

Women in IT: The Facts

Women in IT: The Facts

Women in IT: The Facts, sponsored by NCWIT's Workforce Alliance, brings together the latest findings from recent research on technical women. This report gives you:

  • The best available data about the current state of affairs for technical women, in a single, easy-to-access resource
  • A summary of the key barriers to women's participation in technology AND promising practices for addressing these barriers
  • Data and tools to support your organization's change efforts
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Resources for Change Agents

Guide to resources for attracting undergraduate women into computing and retaining them through graduation, including tools for assessing your efforts.

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Summary of Recent Research on Gender and High-tech Start-ups

High-tech startups typically use one of five types of employment models, reflecting their founders’ ideas about hiring and managing employees. These models can have long-lasting effects on firms and predict the trajectory of women’s representation among core technical staff. This research paper looks at the five models, identifies which are most congenial to hiring women, and points out correlations between competitive business models and meritocratic hiring. 

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Top 10 Ways of Recruiting High School Women into Your Computing Classes

Recruiting diverse students to computing requires that you spark their interest, build their confidence they can succeed, create a community where they feel like they belong, and help them see themselves as a "computing person". This Top 10 list offers practices that help you recruit high school girls to your computing courses.

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The Culture of Open Source Computing

The Culture of Open Source Computing

As a first step toward learning more about OSS culture and women’s participation in it, this annotated bibliography briefly describes current research organized into five topics: Gender Dimensions, Entry & Internal Advancement, Knowledge Acquisition, Membership and Organization, and Motivations & Intentions to Participate. This bibliography identifies pertinent articles and offers a brief summary of what are, in many cases, extensive research findings, only two of which focus on gender and OSS. The original publications should be consulted for full details.

How Do You Mentor Technical Women at Work? Sun Engineering Enrichment and Development (SEED) Program (Case Study 1)

How Do You Mentor Technical Women at Work? Sun Engineering Enrichment and Development (SEED) Program (Case Study 1)

Paired mentors and protégés exchange advice for career advancement and reduced turnover. Formal mentoring programs may include organized activities that provide a framework for the mentor-protégé relationship and can lead to more rapid career advancement and higher career satisfaction for participants than non-participants. New hires and established employees at Sun Engineering are paired with executives and senior Engineering staff in a well-organized program.

Gearing Up for Change

Gearing Up for Change: Institutional Reform in Undergraduate Computing Programs

Change agents must understand and consider their organization’s complex and interlocking systems. Plans for change must ensure that subsystems work in harmony with each other to reinforce the envisioned change. This resource outlines the prerequisites to transforming for diversity in undergraduate computing and explains NCWIT’s Extension Services for Undergraduate Programs (ES-UP). Members of the Academic Alliance are entitled to free services from the NCWIT ES-UP in support of their organizational change.

Top 10 Ways Managers Can Retain Technical Women

Top 10 Ways Managers Can Retain Technical Women

This resource includes ten important recommendations supervisors can readily adopt to improve retention for all employees. They are particularly useful for retaining women and employees from underrepresented groups.

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Talk with Faculty Colleagues About Stereotype Threat

This Talking Point Card explains stereotype threat and how it is triggered, shares examples of effects from stereotype threat, and suggests ways to create a stereotype threat-free environment for attracting able and diverse students to computing.

How Can Companies Attract and Retain Mid-Career Female Employees? Constructing On-Ramps (Case Study 1)

How Can Companies Attract and Retain Mid-Career Female Employees? Constructing On-Ramps (Case Study 1)

Flexible work arrangements and career paths, along with re-entry training and support, can attract and retain mid-career female employees. In order to retain women in IT by attracting those who wish to return to work, Lehman Brothers Encore program seeks out non-traditional resumes, provides reentry training and support, and offers flexible work arrangements. In its first year, the program hired 20 new employees.

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