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Top 10 Ways of Recruiting High School Women into Your Computing Classes

Recruiting diverse students to computing requires that you spark their interest, build their confidence they can succeed, create a community where they feel like they belong, and help them see themselves as a "computing person". This Top 10 list offers practices that help you recruit high school girls to your computing courses.

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Male Advocates and Allies (report cover)

Male Advocates and Allies: Promoting Gender Diversity in Technology Workplaces

This report, sponsored by NCWIT's Workforce Alliance, provides an inside look into how men think about  and advocate for diversity in the technical workplace. Drawing from interviews with 47 men in technical companies and departments, this study: 1) Identifies the factors that motivate or hinder men in advocating for gender diversity, 2) explores what diversity efforts men have experienced as successful or unsuccessful, and 3) identifies specific strategies to increase men's participation in advocacy.

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Who Invents IT? Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, 2012 Update

The original 2007 report, Who Invents IT? An Analysis of Women’s Participation in Information Technology Patenting, examined the rates at which women have been patenting in information technology (IT), how these rates have evolved between 1980-2005, and how these rates differ across IT industry sub-categories and across specific organizations. This edition updates the previous report, exploring these trends from 2006-2010.

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Regional Celebrations-in-a-Box: Connecting Communities of Technical Women

Regional Celebrations-in-a-Box contains resources for organizing small conferences designed to increase the participation, retention, and advancement of technical women. This program-in-a-box is a compilation of materials and practices from Regional Celebrations around the country that bring women together in supportive communities for professional growth. The box includes advice about planning and materials for program elements such as intentional role modeling, group and individual mentoring, networking, and ways to share accurate career information.

Top 5 Reasons You Should Work at a Startup

Top 5 Reasons You Should Work at a Startup

Listing the top five reasons to work at a startup, this card encourages computing professionals to consider jobs with members of the NCWIT Entrepreneurial Alliance. 

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How Do You Recruit or Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy? Equal Access: Inclusive Strategies for Teaching Students with Disabilities (Case Study 3)

How Do You Recruit or Retain Women Through Inclusive Pedagogy? Equal Access: Inclusive Strategies for Teaching Students with Disabilities (Case Study 3)

Women and minority students are not in computing courses under the same conditions as their white male classmates. Instructional practices offer opportunities to level the playing field and improve the retention of underrepresented students. More students with learning and physical disabilities are in the educational pipeline than ever before. Being aware of the issues, tools, and services for students with disabilities makes it easier for them to learn and for you to teach them.

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Meet Them Where They Are (Case Study 3)

How Do You Introduce Computing in an Engaging Way? Meet Them Where They Are (Case Study 3)

Engage students not already drawn to computing by creating academic and social environments where these students feel like they belong. Students respond positively to solving real-life problems that draw on their existing knowledge and interests and that involve collaboration in hands-on projects. The Girl Scouts’ “Technobile” is a mobile technology classroom with 12 workstations. It showcases technology and technology careers in ways that appeal to girls, while breaking down the access barriers to IT.

How Do You Provide Intentional Role Modeling? Regional Celebrations of Women in Computing - R-CWIC (Case Study 1)

How Do You Provide Intentional Role Modeling? Regional Celebrations of Women in Computing - R-CWIC (Case Study 1)

In addition to demonstrating expertise and experience, intentional role models display their strengths and weaknesses and help observers see how they could attain a similar position. Role modeling is less interactive than mentoring, but is often a component of mentoring relationships. Women attending the Indiana and Ohio Celebrations of Women in Computing observe role models who are keynote speakers from technical fields, panelists with technical careers in industry, and presenters of technical papers.

How Does Engaging Curriculum Attract Students to Computing? Media Computation at Georgia Tech (Case Study 1)

How Does Engaging Curriculum Attract Students to Computing? Media Computation at Georgia Tech (Case Study 1)

Making curricula more relevant to students, introducing collaborative learning into the classroom, and tailoring courses to different student experience levels benefit female as well as male students. This approach to introductory computing involves encouraging social interaction and creativity while presenting subject matter that is relevant to non-computing majors. Evaluation at Georgia Tech showed that the Media Computation approach resulted in increased student success rates (earning an A, B, or C) from 72 percent to about 85-90 percent.

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Supervisors as Change Agents

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Supervisors as Change Agents

Supervising-in-a-Box Series: Supervisors as Change Agents is for supervisors who wish to become change agents in their organizations. The materials are focused on actions that you as an individual supervisor can take to raise awareness and motivate change. Of course, supervisors cannot “do it all,” but these individual efforts are often what it takes to spark change. The materials here also point to other NCWIT resources that can help with planning more systemic, department, or company-wide change at later stages.

NCWIT Scorecard

NCWIT Scorecard: A Report on the Status of Women in Information Technology

The NCWIT Scorecard shows trends in girls' and women's participation in computing in the U.S. over time, providing a benchmark for measuring progress and identifying areas for improvement.
The Culture of Open Source Computing

The Culture of Open Source Computing

As a first step toward learning more about OSS culture and women’s participation in it, this annotated bibliography briefly describes current research organized into five topics: Gender Dimensions, Entry & Internal Advancement, Knowledge Acquisition, Membership and Organization, and Motivations & Intentions to Participate. This bibliography identifies pertinent articles and offers a brief summary of what are, in many cases, extensive research findings, only two of which focus on gender and OSS. The original publications should be consulted for full details.

Networking and Access to Social Capital: A Review of Research Literature on Women's Entrepreneurship in the Information Technology Field

Entrepreneurial Series Report #4 summarizes research literature on women's entrepreneurship in the information technology field with a focus on networking and access to social capital.

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