Resources

How Can REUs Help Retain Female Undergraduates? Faculty Perspectives (Case Study 1)

How Can REUs Help Retain Female Undergraduates? Faculty Perspectives (Case Study 1)

Undergraduates with positive research experiences feel more confident and motivated to enter graduate programs. To facilitate successful REUs, supportive faculty advisors or graduate mentors should clearly communicate goals to students and allow them to spend a large amount of time on research, increasing independence as the project progresses. Professors Scott McCrickard of Virginia Tech University and Margaret Burnett of Oregon State University treat their undergraduate researchers as members of their respective research teams.

Computer Science-in-a-Box

Computer Science-in-a-Box: Unplug Your Curriculum

Computer Science-in-a-Box: Unplug Your Curriculum introduces fundamental building blocks of computer science -- without using computers. Use it with students ages 9 to 14 to teach lessons about how computers work, while addressing critical mathematics and science concepts such as number systems, algorithms, and manipulating variables and logic. NCWIT is pleased to offer Computer Science-in-a-Box: Unplug Your Curriculum in cooperation with the authors of Computer Science Unplugged. So unplug your computer, and get ready to explore computer science!

Women in IT: The Facts

Women in IT: The Facts

Women in IT: The Facts, sponsored by NCWIT's Workforce Alliance, brings together the latest findings from recent research on technical women. This report gives you:

  • The best available data about the current state of affairs for technical women, in a single, easy-to-access resource
  • A summary of the key barriers to women's participation in technology AND promising practices for addressing these barriers
  • Data and tools to support your organization's change efforts
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Resources for Change Agents

Guide to resources for attracting undergraduate women into computing and retaining them through graduation, including tools for assessing your efforts.

How Can Encouragement Increase Persistence in Computing? Encouragement Works in Academic Settings (Case Study 1)

How Can Encouragement Increase Persistence in Computing? Encouragement Works in Academic Settings (Case Study 1)

Encouragement increases self-efficacy, which is the belief in one’s ability to successfully perform a task. Because we are more likely to engage in tasks that we believe we can perform successfully, encouragement may be especially useful for attracting women to male-stereotyped fields such as computing. Simple though encouragement is, fewer than half of the faculty members in the average computer science department in the United States say they do it.

NCWIT Tips for Job Description Analysis

NCWIT Tips for Job Description Analysis

These tips provide “before and after” examples of ads with balanced language and other guidelines for writing unbiased job descriptions.

View the NCWIT Checklist for Reducing Unconscious Bias in Job Descriptions/Advertisements.

 

 

NCWIT Checklist for Reducing Unconscious Bias in Job Descriptions/Advertisements

NCWIT Checklist for Reducing Unconscious Bias in Job Descriptions/Advertisements

This Job Description Checklist helps you analyze ads for subtle biases in language, in criteria, and in how you describe your workplace.

View NCWIT Tips for Job Description Analysis.

 

 

How Does the Physical Environment Affect Women's Entry and Persistence in Computing? Design Physical Space that Has Broad Appeal (Case Study 1)

How Does the Physical Environment Affect Women's Entry and Persistence in Computing? Design Physical Space that Has Broad Appeal (Case Study 1)

The décor of physical spaces conveys messages about the kinds of people who belong there and the kinds of activities that should be done there. Understanding this influence allows us to actively craft an environment that makes a broad range of people feel welcome in computing. 

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Summary of Recent Research on Gender and High-tech Start-ups

High-tech startups typically use one of five types of employment models, reflecting their founders’ ideas about hiring and managing employees. These models can have long-lasting effects on firms and predict the trajectory of women’s representation among core technical staff. This research paper looks at the five models, identifies which are most congenial to hiring women, and points out correlations between competitive business models and meritocratic hiring. 

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Top 10 Ways of Recruiting High School Women into Your Computing Classes

Recruiting diverse students to computing requires that you spark their interest, build their confidence they can succeed, create a community where they feel like they belong, and help them see themselves as a "computing person". This Top 10 list offers practices that help you recruit high school girls to your computing courses.

View online.

The Culture of Open Source Computing

The Culture of Open Source Computing

As a first step toward learning more about OSS culture and women’s participation in it, this annotated bibliography briefly describes current research organized into five topics: Gender Dimensions, Entry & Internal Advancement, Knowledge Acquisition, Membership and Organization, and Motivations & Intentions to Participate. This bibliography identifies pertinent articles and offers a brief summary of what are, in many cases, extensive research findings, only two of which focus on gender and OSS. The original publications should be consulted for full details.

Why Should Young People Consider Careers in Information Technology?

Created for school counselors by Counselors for Computing (C4C), a project of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance made possible by the Merck Company Foundation, this card gives adults talking points and additional resources for a conversation with their students, children, and/or other young people. The main message is that IT offers meaningful work, security and high salaries with a bachelor’s degree, and flexibility and variety. Information is provided to address these specific questions: What should you tell a young person about a career in IT?

How Do You Retain Women through Collaborative Learning? Pair Programming (Case Study 1)

How Do You Retain Women through Collaborative Learning? Pair Programming (Case Study 1)

Collaborative learning can improve retention rates, critical thinking, appreciation of diversity, and development of social and professional skills. When implementing collaborative learning, match students roughly according to experience levels and make sure to give students opportunities to work together for both graded and un-graded assignments. Pair programming assignments within computer science courses both attract and retain more students in CS majors. In addition, women feel more confident when pair programming is used in the classroom.

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Offer Computing Workshops and Camps: They Benefit Both Students and the Teachers Who Offer Them

This resource for computer science teachers offers ideas for partnering, existing curriculum, and materials for implementation. Download the PDF, read the HTML version below, or use these additional resources.

A practical model for achieving gender parity in undergraduate computing: Change the system, not the student.

This paper presents a systemic change model of undergraduate computing for accomplishing gender parity. Rather than view women as needing to be modified or repaired to fit the system, this model advocates changing the system to fit the needs of a wider range of students. Changing the system is a more sustainable approach to creating gender parity than providing extra support to students with less experience or background or students who are less likely to feel that people like themselves belong in computing.

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